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Article

Inoculation with Mycorrhizal Fungi and Irrigation Management Shape the Bacterial and Fungal Communities and Networks in Vineyard Soils

Department of Viticulture and Enology, University of California Davis, 1 Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Current address: Advanced Fruit and Grape Growing Group, Public University of Navarra, 31006 Pamplona, Spain.
Academic Editor: Mohamed Hijri
Microorganisms 2021, 9(6), 1273; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9061273
Received: 20 May 2021 / Revised: 7 June 2021 / Accepted: 10 June 2021 / Published: 11 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Plant Microbe Interactions)
Vineyard-living microbiota affect grapevine health and adaptation to changing environments and determine the biological quality of soils that strongly influence wine quality. However, their abundance and interactions may be affected by vineyard management. The present study was conducted to assess whether the vineyard soil microbiome was altered by the use of biostimulants (arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) inoculation vs. non-inoculated) and/or irrigation management (fully irrigated vs. half irrigated). Bacterial and fungal communities in vineyard soils were shaped by both time course and soil management (i.e., the use of biostimulants and irrigation). Regarding alpha diversity, fungal communities were more responsive to treatments, whereas changes in beta diversity were mainly recorded in the bacterial communities. Edaphic factors rarely influence bacterial and fungal communities. Microbial network analyses suggested that the bacterial associations were weaker than the fungal ones under half irrigation and that the inoculation with AMF led to the increase in positive associations between vineyard-soil-living microbes. Altogether, the results highlight the need for more studies on the effect of management practices, especially the addition of AMF on cropping systems, to fully understand the factors that drive their variability, strengthen beneficial microbial networks, and achieve better soil quality, which will improve crop performance. View Full-Text
Keywords: arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi; co-occurrence networks; grapevine; microbiome; soil health; water deficit arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi; co-occurrence networks; grapevine; microbiome; soil health; water deficit
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MDPI and ACS Style

Torres, N.; Yu, R.; Kurtural, S.K. Inoculation with Mycorrhizal Fungi and Irrigation Management Shape the Bacterial and Fungal Communities and Networks in Vineyard Soils. Microorganisms 2021, 9, 1273. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9061273

AMA Style

Torres N, Yu R, Kurtural SK. Inoculation with Mycorrhizal Fungi and Irrigation Management Shape the Bacterial and Fungal Communities and Networks in Vineyard Soils. Microorganisms. 2021; 9(6):1273. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9061273

Chicago/Turabian Style

Torres, Nazareth; Yu, Runze; Kurtural, S. K. 2021. "Inoculation with Mycorrhizal Fungi and Irrigation Management Shape the Bacterial and Fungal Communities and Networks in Vineyard Soils" Microorganisms 9, no. 6: 1273. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9061273

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