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Microbial Diversity of Upland Rice Roots and Their Influence on Rice Growth and Drought Tolerance

by 1,2,3, 1,3,4, 1,2,5,* and 1,6,*
1
CAS Key Laboratory of Tropical Plant Resources and Sustainable Use, Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650223, China
2
Center of Economic Botany, Core Botanical Gardens, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Menglun, Mengla, Yunnan 666303, China
3
College of Life Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
4
Center for Integrative Conservation, Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Mengla, Yunnan 666303, China
5
The Innovative Academy of Seed Design, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Menglun, Mengla, Yunnan 666303, China
6
State Key Laboratory for Conservation and Utilization of Bio-Resources in Yunnan, Yunnan University, Kunming 650091, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Microorganisms 2020, 8(9), 1329; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8091329
Received: 11 August 2020 / Revised: 27 August 2020 / Accepted: 30 August 2020 / Published: 31 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Plant Microbe Interactions)
Among abiotic stresses, drought is one of the most important factors limiting plant growth. To increase their drought tolerance and survival, most plants interact directly with a variety of microbes. Upland rice (Oryza sativa L.) is a rice ecotype that differs from irrigated ecotype rice; it is adapted to both drought-stress and aerobic conditions. However, its root microbial resources have not been explored. We isolated bacteria and fungi from roots of upland rice in Xishuangbanna, China. Four hundred sixty-two endophytic and rhizospheric isolates (337 bacteria and 125 fungi) were distributed. They were distributed among 43 genera on the basis of 16S rRNA and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) gene sequence analysis. Notably, these root microbes differed from irrigated rice root microbes in irrigated environments; for example, members of the Firmicutes phylum were enriched (by 28.54%) in the roots of the upland plants. The plant growth-promoting (PGP) potential of 217 isolates was investigated in vitro. The PGP ability of 17 endophytic and 10 rhizospheric isolates from upland rice roots was evaluated under well-irrigated and drought-stress conditions, and 9 fungal strains increased rice seedling shoot length, shoot and root fresh weight (FW), antioxidant capability, and proline (Pro) and soluble sugar contents. Our work suggests that fungi from upland rice roots can increase plant growth under irrigated and drought-stress conditions and can serve as effective microbial resources for sustainable agricultural production in arid regions. View Full-Text
Keywords: rice ecotypes; PGPR; rhizosphere; endophytic fungi; antioxidant rice ecotypes; PGPR; rhizosphere; endophytic fungi; antioxidant
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MDPI and ACS Style

Pang, Z.; Zhao, Y.; Xu, P.; Yu, D. Microbial Diversity of Upland Rice Roots and Their Influence on Rice Growth and Drought Tolerance. Microorganisms 2020, 8, 1329. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8091329

AMA Style

Pang Z, Zhao Y, Xu P, Yu D. Microbial Diversity of Upland Rice Roots and Their Influence on Rice Growth and Drought Tolerance. Microorganisms. 2020; 8(9):1329. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8091329

Chicago/Turabian Style

Pang, Zhiqiang, Ying Zhao, Peng Xu, and Diqiu Yu. 2020. "Microbial Diversity of Upland Rice Roots and Their Influence on Rice Growth and Drought Tolerance" Microorganisms 8, no. 9: 1329. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8091329

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