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Open AccessArticle

Different Dynamics of Bacterial and Fungal Communities in Hive-Stored Bee Bread and Their Possible Roles: A Case Study from Two Commercial Honey Bees in China

1
Faculty of Life Science and Technology, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650500, China
2
Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand
3
Research Center in Bioresources for Agriculture, Industry and Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand
4
Research Center of Microbial Diversity and Sustainable Utilization, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand
5
Academy of Science, The Royal Society of Thailand, Bangkok 10300, Thailand
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Microorganisms 2020, 8(2), 264; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8020264
Received: 3 January 2020 / Revised: 13 February 2020 / Accepted: 13 February 2020 / Published: 15 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Insect Pathogen Interactions)
This study investigated both bacterial and fungal communities in corbicular pollen and hive-stored bee bread of two commercial honey bees, Apis mellifera and Apis cerana, in China. Although both honey bees favor different main floral sources, the dynamics of each microbial community is similar. During pH reduction in hive-stored bee bread, results from conventional culturable methods and next-generation sequencing showed a declining bacterial population but a stable fungal population. Different honey bee species and floral sources might not affect the core microbial community structure but could change the number of bacteria. Corbicular pollen was colonized by the Enterobacteriaceae bacterium (Escherichia-Shiga, Panteoa, Pseudomonas) group; however, the number of bacteria significantly decreased in hive-stored bee bread in less than 72 h. In contrast, Acinetobacter was highly abundant and could utilize protein sources. In terms of the fungal community, the genus Cladosporium remained abundant in both corbicular pollen and hive-stored bee bread. This filamentous fungus might encourage honey bees to reserve pollen by releasing organic acids. Furthermore, several filamentous fungi had the potential to inhibit both commensal/contaminant bacteria and the growth of pathogens. Filamentous fungi, in particular, the genus Cladosporium, could support pollen preservation of both honey bee species. View Full-Text
Keywords: microbial community; corbicular pollen; Chinese commercial honey bee; next-generation sequencing microbial community; corbicular pollen; Chinese commercial honey bee; next-generation sequencing
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MDPI and ACS Style

Disayathanoowat, T.; Li, H.; Supapimon, N.; Suwannarach, N.; Lumyong, S.; Chantawannakul, P.; Guo, J. Different Dynamics of Bacterial and Fungal Communities in Hive-Stored Bee Bread and Their Possible Roles: A Case Study from Two Commercial Honey Bees in China. Microorganisms 2020, 8, 264.

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