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Zoonotic Diseases: Etiology, Impact, and Control
Article

Hedgehogs, Squirrels, and Blackbirds as Sentinel Hosts for Active Surveillance of Borrelia miyamotoi and Borrelia burgdorferi Complex in Urban and Rural Environments

1
Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Science, Charles University, 12800 Prague, Czech Republic
2
Institute of Parasitology, Biology Center, Czech Academy of Sciences (CAS), 37005 Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic
3
Department of Infectious Diseases and Preventive Medicine, Veterinary Research Institute, 62100 Brno, Czech Republic
4
Department of Applied Mathematics and Informatics, Faculty of Economics, University of South Bohemia, 37005 Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic
5
Department of Pathology and Parasitology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 61242 Brno, Czech Republic
6
Center for Infectious Disease Control, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, 3721 Bilthoven, The Netherlands
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Faculty of Tropical AgriSciences, Czech University of Life Sciences, 16500 Prague, Czech Republic
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Faculty of Science, Charles University, 12800 Prague, Czech Republic
9
Faculty of Science, University of Ostrava, 70103 Ostrava, Czech Republic
10
Military Health Institute, Military Medical Agency, 16200 Prague, Czech Republic
11
Department of Botany and Zoology, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, 61137 Brno, Czech Republic
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Microorganisms 2020, 8(12), 1908; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8121908
Received: 15 November 2020 / Revised: 28 November 2020 / Accepted: 29 November 2020 / Published: 30 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Zoonotic Pathogens: A One Health Approach)
Lyme borreliosis (LB), caused by spirochetes of the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.) complex, is one of the most common vector-borne zoonotic diseases in Europe. Knowledge about the enzootic circulation of Borrelia pathogens between ticks and their vertebrate hosts is epidemiologically important and enables assessment of the health risk for the human population. In our project, we focused on the following vertebrate species: European hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus), Northern white-breasted hedgehog (E. roumanicus), Eurasian red squirrel (Sciurus vulgaris), and Common blackbird (Turdus merula). The cadavers of accidentally killed animals used in this study constitute an available source of biological material, and we have confirmed its potential for wide monitoring of B. burgdorferi s.l. presence and genospecies diversity in the urban environment. High infection rates (90% for E. erinaceus, 73% for E. roumanicus, 91% for S. vulgaris, and 68% for T. merula) were observed in all four target host species; mixed infections by several genospecies were detected on the level of individuals, as well as in particular tissue samples. These findings show the usefulness of multiple tissue sampling as tool for revealing the occurrence of several genospecies within one animal and the risk of missing particular B. burgdorferi s.l. genospecies when looking in one organ alone. View Full-Text
Keywords: Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato; Borrelia miyamotoi; European hedgehog; Northern white-breasted hedgehog; Eurasian red squirrel; Common blackbird Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato; Borrelia miyamotoi; European hedgehog; Northern white-breasted hedgehog; Eurasian red squirrel; Common blackbird
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MDPI and ACS Style

Majerová, K.; Hönig, V.; Houda, M.; Papežík, P.; Fonville, M.; Sprong, H.; Rudenko, N.; Golovchenko, M.; Černá Bolfíková, B.; Hulva, P.; Růžek, D.; Hofmannová, L.; Votýpka, J.; Modrý, D. Hedgehogs, Squirrels, and Blackbirds as Sentinel Hosts for Active Surveillance of Borrelia miyamotoi and Borrelia burgdorferi Complex in Urban and Rural Environments. Microorganisms 2020, 8, 1908. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8121908

AMA Style

Majerová K, Hönig V, Houda M, Papežík P, Fonville M, Sprong H, Rudenko N, Golovchenko M, Černá Bolfíková B, Hulva P, Růžek D, Hofmannová L, Votýpka J, Modrý D. Hedgehogs, Squirrels, and Blackbirds as Sentinel Hosts for Active Surveillance of Borrelia miyamotoi and Borrelia burgdorferi Complex in Urban and Rural Environments. Microorganisms. 2020; 8(12):1908. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8121908

Chicago/Turabian Style

Majerová, Karolina, Václav Hönig, Michal Houda, Petr Papežík, Manoj Fonville, Hein Sprong, Natalie Rudenko, Maryna Golovchenko, Barbora Černá Bolfíková, Pavel Hulva, Daniel Růžek, Lada Hofmannová, Jan Votýpka, and David Modrý. 2020. "Hedgehogs, Squirrels, and Blackbirds as Sentinel Hosts for Active Surveillance of Borrelia miyamotoi and Borrelia burgdorferi Complex in Urban and Rural Environments" Microorganisms 8, no. 12: 1908. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8121908

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