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Zoonotic Diseases: Etiology, Impact, and Control

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Department of Microbiology and Hygiene, Faculty of Veterinary Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh 2202, Bangladesh
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Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Sharjah, Sharjah 27272, UAE
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Zoonosis Science Center, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Uppsala University, SE 75123 Uppsala, Sweden
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Adhunik Sadar Hospital, Naogaon 6500, Bangladesh
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Department of Integrative Biology, College of Arts and Sciences, University of South Florida, St. Petersburg, FL 33701, USA
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Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Cairo University, Cairo 11562, Egypt
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Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Microorganisms 2020, 8(9), 1405; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8091405
Received: 12 August 2020 / Revised: 28 August 2020 / Accepted: 2 September 2020 / Published: 12 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Zoonotic Pathogens: A One Health Approach)
Most humans are in contact with animals in a way or another. A zoonotic disease is a disease or infection that can be transmitted naturally from vertebrate animals to humans or from humans to vertebrate animals. More than 60% of human pathogens are zoonotic in origin. This includes a wide variety of bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, parasites, and other pathogens. Factors such as climate change, urbanization, animal migration and trade, travel and tourism, vector biology, anthropogenic factors, and natural factors have greatly influenced the emergence, re-emergence, distribution, and patterns of zoonoses. As time goes on, there are more emerging and re-emerging zoonotic diseases. In this review, we reviewed the etiology of major zoonotic diseases, their impact on human health, and control measures for better management. We also highlighted COVID-19, a newly emerging zoonotic disease of likely bat origin that has affected millions of humans along with devastating global consequences. The implementation of One Health measures is highly recommended for the effective prevention and control of possible zoonosis. View Full-Text
Keywords: zoonosis; pathogens; viruses; bacteria; fungi; animal; SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; one health; prevention zoonosis; pathogens; viruses; bacteria; fungi; animal; SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; one health; prevention
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Rahman, M.T.; Sobur, M.A.; Islam, M.S.; Ievy, S.; Hossain, M.J.; El Zowalaty, M.E.; Rahman, A.T.; Ashour, H.M. Zoonotic Diseases: Etiology, Impact, and Control. Microorganisms 2020, 8, 1405.

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