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Article

Optimization of In Vitro Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare Growth Assays for Therapeutic Development

1
Division of Pulmonology, Allergy and Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, 10900 Euclid Ave. BRB 822, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA
2
Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Children’s Mercy Hospital, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, 2401 Gillham Rd., Kansas City, MO 64108, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Microorganisms 2019, 7(2), 42; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms7020042
Received: 17 December 2018 / Revised: 12 January 2019 / Accepted: 20 January 2019 / Published: 1 February 2019
Infection with nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is a complication of lung disease in immunocompromised patients, including those with human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and cystic fibrosis (CF). The most widespread, disease-causing NTM is Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), which colonizes the lungs as a combination of Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium intracellulare, and other mycobacterial species. While combination drug therapy exists for MAC colonization, there is no cure. Therapeutic development to treat MAC has been difficult because of the slow-growing nature of the bacterial complex, limiting the ability to characterize the bacteria’s growth in response to new therapeutics. The development of a technology that allows observation of both the MAC predominant strains and MAC could provide a means to develop new therapeutics to treat NTM. We have developed a new methodology in which M. avium and M. intracellulare can be optimally grown in short term culture to study each strain independently and in combination, as a monitor of growth kinetics and efficient therapeutic testing protocols. View Full-Text
Keywords: Mycobacterium intracellulare; Mycobacterium avium; optimized growth; anti-non-tuberculous mycobacterium therapeutic testing Mycobacterium intracellulare; Mycobacterium avium; optimized growth; anti-non-tuberculous mycobacterium therapeutic testing
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MDPI and ACS Style

Auster, L.; Sutton, M.; Gwin, M.C.; Nitkin, C.; Bonfield, T.L. Optimization of In Vitro Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare Growth Assays for Therapeutic Development. Microorganisms 2019, 7, 42. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms7020042

AMA Style

Auster L, Sutton M, Gwin MC, Nitkin C, Bonfield TL. Optimization of In Vitro Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare Growth Assays for Therapeutic Development. Microorganisms. 2019; 7(2):42. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms7020042

Chicago/Turabian Style

Auster, Lauren, Morgan Sutton, Mary C. Gwin, Christopher Nitkin, and Tracey L. Bonfield 2019. "Optimization of In Vitro Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare Growth Assays for Therapeutic Development" Microorganisms 7, no. 2: 42. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms7020042

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