Next Article in Journal
Fermented Seeds (“Zgougou”) from Aleppo Pine as a Novel Source of Potentially Probiotic Lactic Acid Bacteria
Previous Article in Journal
The Effects of a Microorganisms-Based Commercial Product on the Morphological, Biochemical and Yield of Tomato Plants under Two Different Water Regimes
Open AccessArticle

Introduction of NGS in Environmental Surveillance for Healthcare-Associated Infection Control

1
Institute for Maternal and Child Health-IRCCS “Burlo Garofolo”, 34137 Trieste, Italy
2
Department of Medical Sciences, University of Trieste, 34137 Trieste, Italy
3
Section of Microbiology, Department of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara, Italy
4
CIAS (Centro ricerche Inquinamento ambienti Alta Sterilità) Research Center, University of Ferrara, 44122 Ferrara, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Microorganisms 2019, 7(12), 708; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms7120708
Received: 15 November 2019 / Revised: 12 December 2019 / Accepted: 13 December 2019 / Published: 16 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Public Health Microbiology)
The hospital environment significantly contributes to the onset of healthcare associated infections (HAIs), representing the most frequent and severe complications related to health care. The monitoring of hospital surfaces is generally addressed by microbial cultural isolation, with some performance limitations. Hence there is need to implement environmental surveillance systems using more effective methods. This study aimed to evaluate next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies for hospital environment microbiome characterization, in comparison with conventional and molecular methods, in an Italian pediatric hospital. Environmental samples included critical surfaces of randomized rooms, surgical rooms, intensive care units and delivery rooms. The resistome of the contaminating population was also evaluated. NGS, compared to other methods, detected with higher sensitivity the environmental bacteria, and was the only method able to detect even unsearched bacteria. By contrast, however, it did not detect mycetes, nor it could distinguish viable from dead bacteria. Microbiological and PCR methods could identify and quantify mycetes, in addition to bacteria, and PCR could define the population resistome. These data suggest that NGS could be an effective method for hospital environment monitoring, especially if flanked by PCR for species identification and resistome characterization, providing a potential tool for the control of HAI transmission. View Full-Text
Keywords: healthcare-associated infections; antimicrobial resistance; contamination; molecular methods; next generation sequencing healthcare-associated infections; antimicrobial resistance; contamination; molecular methods; next generation sequencing
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Comar, M.; D’Accolti, M.; Cason, C.; Soffritti, I.; Campisciano, G.; Lanzoni, L.; Bisi, M.; Volta, A.; Mazzacane, S.; Caselli, E. Introduction of NGS in Environmental Surveillance for Healthcare-Associated Infection Control. Microorganisms 2019, 7, 708.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop