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Open AccessArticle

Probiotics Prevents Sensitization to Oral Antigen and Subsequent Increases in Intestinal Tight Junction Permeability in Juvenile–Young Adult Rats

1
Department of Pediatrics, Jichi Medical University, 3311-1 Yakushiji, Shimotsuke, Tochigi 3290498, Japan
2
Department of Immunology and Laboratory, School of Biomedicine, Mongolian National University of Medical Sciences, Jamyan St 3, Ulaanbaatar 14210, Mongolia
3
Division of Bacteriology, Department of Infection and Immunity, Jichi Medical University, 3311-1 Yakushiji, Shimotsuke, Tochigi 3290498, Japan
4
Department of Medical Informatics, Center for Information, Jichi Medical University, 3311-1 Yakushiji, Shimotsuke, Tochigi 3290498, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Microorganisms 2019, 7(10), 463; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms7100463
Received: 3 September 2019 / Revised: 10 October 2019 / Accepted: 14 October 2019 / Published: 16 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Host-Gut Microbiota Interactions)
Increased intestinal permeability is thought to underlie the pathogenesis of food allergy. We explore the mechanism responsible for changes in the morphology and function of the intestinal barrier using a rat model of food allergy, focusing on the contribution of intestinal microbiota. Juvenile–young adult rats were sensitized with ovalbumin and treated with antibiotics or probiotics (Clostridium butyricum and Lactobacillus reuteri), respectively. The serum ovalbumin-IgE levels, intestinal permeability, histopathological features, tight junction (TJ)-associated proteins, Th2 cytokines, and gut microbiota in feces were analyzed in each group. Sensitized rats showed an increase in ovalbumin-IgE levels and intestinal permeability with gut mucosal inflammation, whereas rats that received probiotics were only mildly affected. Rats given ovalbumin, but not those given probiotics, showed a reduction in both TJ-related protein expression and localization. Th2 cytokine levels were increased in the sensitized rats, but not in those given probiotics. TJs in rats treated with ovalbumin and antibiotics were disrupted, but those in rats administered probiotics were undamaged. Clostridiaceae were increased in the probiotics groups, especially Alkaliphilus, relative to the ovalbumin-sensitized group. Gut microbiota appears to play a role in regulating epithelial barrier function, and probiotics may help to prevent food sensitization through the up-regulation of TJ proteins. View Full-Text
Keywords: barrier; claudin; food allergy; occludin; ovalbumin; probiotics; sensitization; zonula occludens barrier; claudin; food allergy; occludin; ovalbumin; probiotics; sensitization; zonula occludens
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Tulyeu, J.; Kumagai, H.; Jimbo, E.; Watanabe, S.; Yokoyama, K.; Cui, L.; Osaka, H.; Mieno, M.; Yamagata, T. Probiotics Prevents Sensitization to Oral Antigen and Subsequent Increases in Intestinal Tight Junction Permeability in Juvenile–Young Adult Rats. Microorganisms 2019, 7, 463.

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