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Arts, Volume 4, Issue 3 (September 2015) – 3 articles , Pages 75-120

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Open AccessArticle
Manual of Cupule Replication Technology
Arts 2015, 4(3), 101-120; https://doi.org/10.3390/arts4030101 - 23 Sep 2015
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2213
Abstract
Throughout the world, iconic rock art is preceded by non-iconic rock art. Cupules (manmade, roughly semi-hemispherical depressions on rocks) form the major bulk of the early non-iconic rock art globally. The antiquity of cupules extends back to the Lower Paleolithic in Asia and [...] Read more.
Throughout the world, iconic rock art is preceded by non-iconic rock art. Cupules (manmade, roughly semi-hemispherical depressions on rocks) form the major bulk of the early non-iconic rock art globally. The antiquity of cupules extends back to the Lower Paleolithic in Asia and Africa, hundreds of thousand years ago. When one observes these cupules, the inquisitive mind poses so many questions with regard to understanding their technology, reasons for selecting the site, which rocks were used to make the hammer stones used, the skill and cognitive abilities employed to create the different types of cupules, the objective of their creation, their age, and so on. Replication of the cupules can provide satisfactory answers to some of these questions. Comparison of the hammer stones and cupules produced by the replication process with those obtained from excavation can provide support to observations. This paper presents a manual of cupule replication technology based on our experience of cupule replication on hard quartzite rock near Daraki-Chattan in the Chambal Basin, India. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection World Rock Art)
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Open AccessCreative
The Development of Public Art and its Future Passive, Active and Interactive Past, Present and Future
Arts 2015, 4(3), 93-100; https://doi.org/10.3390/arts4030093 - 22 Jul 2015
Viewed by 4589
Abstract
Never in the history of mankind have fundamental relationships changed so dramatically fast and with such far reaching consequences as in our time—now. [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Kinetic and Op Art)
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Open AccessEssay
Swing Low, Sweet Chariot: Kinetic Sculpture and the Crisis of Western Technocentrism
Arts 2015, 4(3), 75-92; https://doi.org/10.3390/arts4030075 - 07 Jul 2015
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 7327
Abstract
Beginning with the chariot as an ancient and pan-cultural example of the way in which art has humanized technology, this essay explores the limited role which modern art has thus far played in dealing with the current crisis of technocentrism. It does so [...] Read more.
Beginning with the chariot as an ancient and pan-cultural example of the way in which art has humanized technology, this essay explores the limited role which modern art has thus far played in dealing with the current crisis of technocentrism. It does so by bringing to bear on the subject a newly-promulgated theory of the development of modern art which focuses on the absence therein of an evolved kinetic sculpture. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Kinetic and Op Art)
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