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Article

Factorial Study on the Impact of Climate Change on Freeze-Thaw Damage, Mould Growth and Wood Decay in Solid Masonry Walls in Brussels

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Building Physics Group, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Ghent University, 9000 Ghent, Belgium
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Atmospheric Physics Group, Faculty of Sciences, Ghent University, 9000 Ghent, Belgium
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Department Meteorological and Climatological Research, Royal Meteorological Institute of Belgium, 1180 Brussels, Belgium
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Humberto Varum
Buildings 2021, 11(3), 134; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings11030134
Received: 1 March 2021 / Revised: 18 March 2021 / Accepted: 20 March 2021 / Published: 23 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Resilient Buildings)
Previous studies show that climate change has an impact on the damage risks in solid masonry facades. To conserve these valuable buildings, it is important to determine the projected change in damages for the original and internally insulated cases. Since historical masonry covers a wide range of properties, it is unknown how sensitive the climate change impact is to variations in different parameters, such as wall thickness, brick type, etc. A factorial study is performed to determine the climate change impact on freeze-thaw risk, mould growth and wood decay in solid masonry in Brussels, Belgium. It is found that the critical orientation equals the critical wind-driven rain orientation and does not change over time. Further, the freeze-thaw risk is generally decreasing, whereas the change in mould growth and wood decay depends on the climate scenario. Knowing the brick type and rain exposure coefficient is most important when assessing the climate change impact. For freeze-thaw risk and wood decay, it is found that simulating one wall thickness for the uninsulated and one insulated case is sufficient to represent the climate change impact. Finally, the effects of climate change generally do not compensate for the increase in damage after the application of internal insulation. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate change; sensitivity analysis; interior insulation; historical brick; freeze-thaw damage; mould growth; wood decay; HAM simulations; hygrothermal behaviour climate change; sensitivity analysis; interior insulation; historical brick; freeze-thaw damage; mould growth; wood decay; HAM simulations; hygrothermal behaviour
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MDPI and ACS Style

Vandemeulebroucke, I.; Caluwaerts, S.; Van Den Bossche, N. Factorial Study on the Impact of Climate Change on Freeze-Thaw Damage, Mould Growth and Wood Decay in Solid Masonry Walls in Brussels. Buildings 2021, 11, 134. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings11030134

AMA Style

Vandemeulebroucke I, Caluwaerts S, Van Den Bossche N. Factorial Study on the Impact of Climate Change on Freeze-Thaw Damage, Mould Growth and Wood Decay in Solid Masonry Walls in Brussels. Buildings. 2021; 11(3):134. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings11030134

Chicago/Turabian Style

Vandemeulebroucke, Isabeau, Steven Caluwaerts, and Nathan Van Den Bossche. 2021. "Factorial Study on the Impact of Climate Change on Freeze-Thaw Damage, Mould Growth and Wood Decay in Solid Masonry Walls in Brussels" Buildings 11, no. 3: 134. https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings11030134

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