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Open AccessArticle

Prediction of Microstructure Constituents’ Hardness after the Isothermal Decomposition of Austenite

1
Faculty of Engineering, University of Rijeka, Vukovarska 58, 51000 Rijeka, Croatia
2
University Center Koprivnica, University North, Trg dr. Žarka Dolinara 1, 48000 Koprivnica, Croatia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Metals 2021, 11(2), 180; https://doi.org/10.3390/met11020180
Received: 9 December 2020 / Revised: 17 January 2021 / Accepted: 18 January 2021 / Published: 20 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Heat Treatment and Mechanical Properties of Metals and Alloys)
An increase in technical requirements related to the prediction of mechanical properties of steel engineering components requires a deep understanding of relations which exist between microstructure, chemical composition and mechanical properties. This paper is dedicated to the research of the relation between steel hardness with the microstructure, chemical composition and temperature of isothermal decomposition of austenite. When setting the equations for predicting the hardness of microstructure constituents, it was assumed that: (1) The pearlite hardness depends on the carbon content in a steel and on the undercooling below the critical temperature, (2) the martensite hardness depends primarily on its carbon content, (3) the hardness of bainite can be between that of untempered martensite and pearlite in the same steel. The equations for estimation of microstructure constituents’ hardness after the isothermal decomposition of austenite have been proposed. By the comparison of predicted hardness using a mathematical model with experimental results, it can be concluded that hardness of considered low-alloy steels could be successfully predicted by the proposed model. View Full-Text
Keywords: low-alloy steel; quenching; austenite decomposition; mechanical properties; hardness low-alloy steel; quenching; austenite decomposition; mechanical properties; hardness
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MDPI and ACS Style

Smokvina Hanza, S.; Smoljan, B.; Štic, L.; Hajdek, K. Prediction of Microstructure Constituents’ Hardness after the Isothermal Decomposition of Austenite. Metals 2021, 11, 180. https://doi.org/10.3390/met11020180

AMA Style

Smokvina Hanza S, Smoljan B, Štic L, Hajdek K. Prediction of Microstructure Constituents’ Hardness after the Isothermal Decomposition of Austenite. Metals. 2021; 11(2):180. https://doi.org/10.3390/met11020180

Chicago/Turabian Style

Smokvina Hanza, Sunčana; Smoljan, Božo; Štic, Lovro; Hajdek, Krunoslav. 2021. "Prediction of Microstructure Constituents’ Hardness after the Isothermal Decomposition of Austenite" Metals 11, no. 2: 180. https://doi.org/10.3390/met11020180

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