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Article

Fail-Safe Joints between Copper Alloy (C18150) and Nickel-Based Superalloy (GH4169) Made by Transient Liquid Phase (TLP) Bonding and Using Boron-Nickel (BNi-2) Interlayer

by 1,2,* and 3,4
1
International Research Institute for Steel Technology, School of Sciences, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081, China
2
Technical Centre, Shanghai Aerospace Equipment Manufacturer, Shanghai 200245, China
3
School of Engineering & Innovation (STEM), The Open University, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA, UK
4
School of Materials and Metallurgy, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Andreas Chrysanthou
Metals 2021, 11(10), 1504; https://doi.org/10.3390/met11101504
Received: 21 August 2021 / Revised: 11 September 2021 / Accepted: 20 September 2021 / Published: 23 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Technology and Applications of Diffusion Bonding)
Joining heat conducting alloys, such as copper and its alloys, to heat resistant nickel-based superalloys has vast applications in nuclear power plants (including future fusion reactors) and liquid propellant launch vehicles. On the other hand, fusion welding of most dissimilar alloys tends to be unsuccessful due to incompatibilities in their physical properties and melting points. Therefore, solid-state processes, such as diffusion bonding, explosive welding, and friction welding, are considered and commercially used to join various families of dissimilar materials. However, the solid-state diffusion bonding of copper alloys normally results in a substantial deformation of the alloy under the applied bonding load. Therefore, transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding, which requires minimal bonding pressure, was considered to join copper alloy (C18150) to a nickel-based superalloy (GH4169) in this work. BNi-2 foil was used as an interlayer, and the optimum bonding time (keeping the bonding temperature constant as 1030 °C) was determined based on microstructural examinations by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), tensile testing, and nano-hardness measurements. TLP bonding at 1030 °C for 90 min resulted in isothermal solidification, hence obtained joints free from eutectic phases. All of the tensile-tested samples failed within the copper alloy and away from their joints. The hardness distribution across the bond zone was also studied. View Full-Text
Keywords: transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding; joining; copper alloy; nickel-based superalloy; interlayer transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding; joining; copper alloy; nickel-based superalloy; interlayer
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MDPI and ACS Style

Zhang, C.; Shirzadi, A. Fail-Safe Joints between Copper Alloy (C18150) and Nickel-Based Superalloy (GH4169) Made by Transient Liquid Phase (TLP) Bonding and Using Boron-Nickel (BNi-2) Interlayer. Metals 2021, 11, 1504. https://doi.org/10.3390/met11101504

AMA Style

Zhang C, Shirzadi A. Fail-Safe Joints between Copper Alloy (C18150) and Nickel-Based Superalloy (GH4169) Made by Transient Liquid Phase (TLP) Bonding and Using Boron-Nickel (BNi-2) Interlayer. Metals. 2021; 11(10):1504. https://doi.org/10.3390/met11101504

Chicago/Turabian Style

Zhang, Chengcong, and Amir Shirzadi. 2021. "Fail-Safe Joints between Copper Alloy (C18150) and Nickel-Based Superalloy (GH4169) Made by Transient Liquid Phase (TLP) Bonding and Using Boron-Nickel (BNi-2) Interlayer" Metals 11, no. 10: 1504. https://doi.org/10.3390/met11101504

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