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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

Disassembly of Li Ion Cells—Characterization and Safety Considerations of a Recycling Scheme

1
WMG, University of Warwick, International Manufacturing Centre, Coventry CV4 7AL, UK
2
School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Metals 2020, 10(6), 773; https://doi.org/10.3390/met10060773
Received: 15 May 2020 / Revised: 2 June 2020 / Accepted: 5 June 2020 / Published: 9 June 2020
It is predicted there will be a rapid increase in the number of lithium ion batteries reaching end of life. However, recently only 5% of lithium ion batteries (LIBs) were recycled in the European Union. This paper explores why and how this can be improved by controlled dismantling, characterization and recycling. Currently, the favored disposal route for batteries is shredding of complete systems and then separation of individual fractions. This can be effective for the partial recovery of some materials, producing impure, mixed or contaminated waste streams. For an effective circular economy it would be beneficial to produce greater purity waste streams and be able to re-use (as well as recycle) some components; thus, a dismantling system could have advantages over shredding. This paper presents an alternative complete system disassembly process route for lithium ion batteries and examines the various processes required to enable material or component recovery. A schematic is presented of the entire process for all material components along with a materials recovery assay. Health and safety considerations and options for each stage of the process are also reported. This is with an aim of encouraging future battery dismantling operations. View Full-Text
Keywords: batteries; reuse; recycling; disassembly; safety batteries; reuse; recycling; disassembly; safety
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MDPI and ACS Style

Marshall, J.; Gastol, D.; Sommerville, R.; Middleton, B.; Goodship, V.; Kendrick, E. Disassembly of Li Ion Cells—Characterization and Safety Considerations of a Recycling Scheme. Metals 2020, 10, 773. https://doi.org/10.3390/met10060773

AMA Style

Marshall J, Gastol D, Sommerville R, Middleton B, Goodship V, Kendrick E. Disassembly of Li Ion Cells—Characterization and Safety Considerations of a Recycling Scheme. Metals. 2020; 10(6):773. https://doi.org/10.3390/met10060773

Chicago/Turabian Style

Marshall, Jean; Gastol, Dominika; Sommerville, Roberto; Middleton, Beth; Goodship, Vannessa; Kendrick, Emma. 2020. "Disassembly of Li Ion Cells—Characterization and Safety Considerations of a Recycling Scheme" Metals 10, no. 6: 773. https://doi.org/10.3390/met10060773

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