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Article

The Effect of Molybdenum on Precipitation Behaviour in Austenite of Strip-Cast Steels Containing Niobium

1
Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC 3216, Australia
2
Department of Structural Steels, Central Iron and Steel Research Institute, Beijing 100081, China
3
Future Industries Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Metals 2020, 10(10), 1330; https://doi.org/10.3390/met10101330
Received: 5 September 2020 / Revised: 28 September 2020 / Accepted: 30 September 2020 / Published: 5 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Strip Casting of Metals and Alloys)
Two low-C steels microalloyed with niobium (Nb) were fabricated by simulated strip casting, one with molybdenum (Mo) and the other without Mo. Both steels were heat treated to simulate coiling at 900 °C to investigate the effect of Mo on the precipitation behaviour in austenite in low-C strip-cast Nb steels. The mechanical properties results show that during the isothermal holding at 900 °C the hardness of both steels increases and reaches a peak after 3000 s and then decreased after 10,000 s. Additionally, the hardness of the Mo-containing steel is higher than that of the Mo-free steel in all heat-treated conditions. Thermo-Calc predictions suggest that MC-type carbides exist in equilibrium at 900 °C, which are confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM examination shows that precipitates are formed after 1000 s of isothermal holding in both steels and the size of the particles is refined by the addition of Mo. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) reveal that the carbides are enriched in Nb and N. The presence of Mo is also observed in the particles in the Nb-Mo steel during isothermal holding at 900 °C. The concentration of Mo in the precipitates decreases with increasing particle size and isothermal holding time. The precipitates in the Nb-Mo steel provide significant strengthening increments of up to 140 MPa, higher than that in the Nb steel, ~96 MPa. A thermodynamic rationale is given, which explains that the enrichment of Mo in the precipitates reduces the interfacial energy between precipitates and matrix. This is likely to lower the energy barrier for their nucleation and also reduce the coarsening rate, thus leading to finer precipitates during isothermal holding at 900 °C. View Full-Text
Keywords: molybdenum; precipitation; austenite; niobium steels; strip casting molybdenum; precipitation; austenite; niobium steels; strip casting
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MDPI and ACS Style

Jiang, L.; Marceau, R.K.W.; Dorin, T.; Yin, H.; Sun, X.; Hodgson, P.D.; Stanford, N. The Effect of Molybdenum on Precipitation Behaviour in Austenite of Strip-Cast Steels Containing Niobium. Metals 2020, 10, 1330. https://doi.org/10.3390/met10101330

AMA Style

Jiang L, Marceau RKW, Dorin T, Yin H, Sun X, Hodgson PD, Stanford N. The Effect of Molybdenum on Precipitation Behaviour in Austenite of Strip-Cast Steels Containing Niobium. Metals. 2020; 10(10):1330. https://doi.org/10.3390/met10101330

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jiang, Lu, Ross K. W. Marceau, Thomas Dorin, Huaying Yin, Xinjun Sun, Peter D. Hodgson, and Nicole Stanford. 2020. "The Effect of Molybdenum on Precipitation Behaviour in Austenite of Strip-Cast Steels Containing Niobium" Metals 10, no. 10: 1330. https://doi.org/10.3390/met10101330

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