Next Article in Journal
Presenting Health Status in Children Using a Radar Plot
Next Article in Special Issue
The Effects of Postprandial Resistance Exercise on Blood Glucose and Lipids in Prediabetic, Beta-Thalassemia Major Patients
Previous Article in Journal
Acute Caffeine Supplementation Does Not Improve Performance in Trained CrossFit® Athletes
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Assessment and Relationship Between Quality of Life and Physical Activity Levels in Greek Breast Cancer Female Patients under Chemotherapy
 
 
Article

Backward Running: Acute Effects on Sprint Performance in Preadolescent Boys

1
Laboratory of Evaluation of Human Biological Performance, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport Science, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece
2
Division of Kinesiology, School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong, Pok Fu Lam 00000, Hong Kong
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Sports 2020, 8(4), 55; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8040055
Received: 19 February 2020 / Revised: 12 April 2020 / Accepted: 20 April 2020 / Published: 23 April 2020
The aim of this study was to examine the acute effect of backward running (BwR) during warm-up on a 20-m sprint of boys’ performance, compared to forward running (FwR). Fourteen recreationally active preadolescent boys (aged 12.5 ± 0.5 years) were examined in 3 protocols: warm-up (control condition), warm-up with 3 × 10 m additional BwR sprints and warm-up with 3 × 10 m additional FwR sprints. Participants were evaluated 4 minutes after each protocol on a 20-m sprint and intermediate distances, as well as the rate of perceived exertion (RPE). Sprint speed across 10-20 m was significantly higher for the BwR warm-up compared to the regular warm-up (p < 0.05) and a significantly higher RPE after the BwR and FwR protocols compared to the control condition was recorded (p < 0.05). No significant difference was detected across the distances 0–5, 5–10, 0–10 and 0–20 m. Although adding 3 × 10-m sprints of BwR or FwR after the warm-up did not enhance performance in a 20 m sprint of preadolescent boys, the positive effect of BwR across 10–20 m distance suggests that BwR could be an alternative means for enhancing performance for certain phases of a sprint for this age. However, preadolescent boys’ response to different sprint conditioning exercise stimuli and the optimization of rest time to maximize performance remain to be determined. View Full-Text
Keywords: preadolescence; child; post-activation performance enhancement; sprint; warm-up; rate of perceived exertion preadolescence; child; post-activation performance enhancement; sprint; warm-up; rate of perceived exertion
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Petrakis, D.; Bassa, E.; Papavasileiou, A.; Xenofondos, A.; Patikas, D.A. Backward Running: Acute Effects on Sprint Performance in Preadolescent Boys. Sports 2020, 8, 55. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8040055

AMA Style

Petrakis D, Bassa E, Papavasileiou A, Xenofondos A, Patikas DA. Backward Running: Acute Effects on Sprint Performance in Preadolescent Boys. Sports. 2020; 8(4):55. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8040055

Chicago/Turabian Style

Petrakis, Dimitrios, Eleni Bassa, Anastasia Papavasileiou, Anthi Xenofondos, and Dimitrios A. Patikas. 2020. "Backward Running: Acute Effects on Sprint Performance in Preadolescent Boys" Sports 8, no. 4: 55. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8040055

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop