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Article

Acute Caffeine Supplementation Does Not Improve Performance in Trained CrossFit® Athletes

Department of Kinesiology, College of Health and Human Sciences, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA
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Sports 2020, 8(4), 54; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8040054
Received: 22 February 2020 / Revised: 8 April 2020 / Accepted: 21 April 2020 / Published: 23 April 2020
Caffeine’s ergogenic effects persist during various exercise modalities; however, information establishing its efficacy during CrossFit® protocols is limited. This study aimed to determine the effects of caffeine supplementation on CrossFit® performance. Twenty CrossFit®-trained men (age = 26.7 ± 6.2 years, experience = 3.7 ± 2.9 years) were randomized in a double-blind, crossover design. Participants completed two sessions separated by a seven-day washout period, 60 min after consuming 5 mg/kg body mass of caffeine or a placebo. In each session, participants completed as many rounds as possible in 20 min of five pull-ups, 10 push-ups, and 15 air squats. CrossFit® performance was the total number of repetitions completed in 20 min. Paired-samples t-tests were used to compare CrossFit® performance between caffeine and placebo conditions and to test for a potential learning effect between the first and second sessions. CrossFit® performance was not significantly different during the caffeine condition compared to the placebo (468.6 ± 114.7 vs. 466.7 ± 94.3 repetitions, p = 0.861). A significant learning effect was identified between the first and second sessions (452.4 ± 101 vs. 483.8 ± 106.5 repetitions, p = 0.001), with no significant effect of treatment order (p = 0.438). Caffeine’s ergogenic effect were not present during the CrossFit® workout “Cindy”; however, future research should include familiarization sessions and examine other CrossFit® workouts in novice and women participants. View Full-Text
Keywords: high intensity functional training; exercise; muscular endurance; ergogenic aids; sports nutrition high intensity functional training; exercise; muscular endurance; ergogenic aids; sports nutrition
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MDPI and ACS Style

Stein, J.A.; Ramirez, M.; Heinrich, K.M. Acute Caffeine Supplementation Does Not Improve Performance in Trained CrossFit® Athletes. Sports 2020, 8, 54. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8040054

AMA Style

Stein JA, Ramirez M, Heinrich KM. Acute Caffeine Supplementation Does Not Improve Performance in Trained CrossFit® Athletes. Sports. 2020; 8(4):54. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8040054

Chicago/Turabian Style

Stein, Jesse A., Melitza Ramirez, and Katie M. Heinrich. 2020. "Acute Caffeine Supplementation Does Not Improve Performance in Trained CrossFit® Athletes" Sports 8, no. 4: 54. https://doi.org/10.3390/sports8040054

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