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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

Relative Strength, but Not Absolute Muscle Strength, Is Higher in Exercising Compared to Non-Exercising Older Women

1
Laboratório de Avaliação do Movimento Humano, Faculdade de Educação Física e Dança, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia 74690-900, Brazil
2
Departamento de Fisiologia, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo 04023-062, Brazil
3
Departamento de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia de Cabeça e Pescoço, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo 04039-002, Brazil
4
Centro Universtario Evangelica, Anápolis 75083-515, Brazil
5
Centro de Educação Física e Desportos, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória 29060-220, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sports 2019, 7(1), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports7010019
Received: 29 November 2018 / Revised: 20 December 2018 / Accepted: 4 January 2019 / Published: 10 January 2019
Exercise has been suggested for older adults. However, there is no consensus whether exercising older adults present better strength levels and body composition indexes compared with inactive counterparts. Our aim was to compare absolute and relative isokinetic muscular knee strength and body composition between exercising and non-exercising older women. Exercising (n = 20) and non-exercising (n = 21) groups were evaluated for body mass index (BMI), body composition, and isokinetic muscular knee strength. BMI (p = 0.005), total body mass (p = 0.01), fat mass (p = 0.01), and fat mass percentage (p = 0.01) were higher in non-exercising women, and the lean mass percentage was lower in the non-exercising group (p = 0.01). Isokinetic extensor and flexor knee muscle strength for dominant limbs presented higher peak torque values when corrected for total body mass (Nm·kg−1) in the exercising group (p < 0.05). Exercising older women presented better body composition and higher strength relative to total body mass, but not maximum absolute strength. View Full-Text
Keywords: aging; isokinetic dynamometer; knee; body composition; exercise aging; isokinetic dynamometer; knee; body composition; exercise
MDPI and ACS Style

De Lira, C.; Vargas, V.; Silva, W.; Bachi, A.; Vancini, R.; Andrade, M. Relative Strength, but Not Absolute Muscle Strength, Is Higher in Exercising Compared to Non-Exercising Older Women. Sports 2019, 7, 19.

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