Next Article in Journal
Within-Subject Consistency of Unimodal and Bimodal Force Application during the Countermovement Jump
Previous Article in Journal
Off-Training Levels of Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Young Athletes: Preliminary Results during a Typical Week
Open AccessArticle

The Relationship between Running Power and Running Economy in Well-Trained Distance Runners

1
Proehl Exercise Physiology Laboratory, Kinesiology Department, State University of New York at Cortland, Cortland, NY 13045, USA
2
Athletics Department, State University of New York at Cortland, Cortland, NY 13045, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sports 2018, 6(4), 142; https://doi.org/10.3390/sports6040142
Received: 14 September 2018 / Revised: 30 October 2018 / Accepted: 1 November 2018 / Published: 6 November 2018
A novel running wearable called the Stryd Summit footpod fastens to a runner’s shoe and estimates running power. The footpod separates power output into two components, Stryd power and form power. The purpose of this study was to measure the correlations between running economy and power and form power at lactate threshold pace. Seventeen well-trained distance runners, 9 male and 8 female, completed a running protocol. Participants ran two four-minute trials: one with a self-selected cadence, and one with a target cadence lowered by 10%. The mean running economy expressed in terms of oxygen cost at self-selected cadence was 201.6 ± 12.8 mL·kg−1·km−1, and at lowered cadence was 204.5 ± 11.5 mL·kg−1·km−1. Ventilation rate and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were not significantly different between cadence conditions with one-tailed paired t-test analysis (ventilation, p = 0.77, RPE, p = 0.07). Respiratory exchange ratio and caloric unit cost were significantly greater with lower cadence condition (respiratory exchange ratio, p = 0.03, caloric unit cost, p = 0.03). Mean power at self-selected cadence was 4.4 ± 0.5 W·kg−1, and at lowered cadence was 4.4 ± 0.5 W·kg−1. Mean form power at self-selected cadence was 1.1 ± 0.1 W·kg−1, and at lowered cadence was 1.1 ± 0.1 W·kg−1. There were positive, linear correlations between running economy and power (self-selected cadence and lower cadence, r = 0.6; the 90% confidence interval was 0.2 to 0.8); running economy and form power (self-selected cadence and lower cadence r = 0.5; the 90% confidence interval was 0.1 to 0.8). The findings suggest running economy is positively correlated with Stryd’s power and form power measures yet the footpod may not be sufficiently accurate to estimate differences in the running economy of competitive runners. View Full-Text
Keywords: power; running; running economy; running power meter; Stryd; distance runners; wearables; accelerometry power; running; running economy; running power meter; Stryd; distance runners; wearables; accelerometry
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Austin, C.L.; Hokanson, J.F.; McGinnis, P.M.; Patrick, S. The Relationship between Running Power and Running Economy in Well-Trained Distance Runners. Sports 2018, 6, 142.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop