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Open AccessArticle

Nanoscale Automated Quantitative Mineralogy: A 200-nm Quantitative Mineralogy Assessment of Fault Gouge Using Mineralogic

by Shaun Graham 1 and Nynke Keulen 2,*
1
Carl Zeiss Microscopy GmbH, ZEISS Group, 50 Kaki Bukit Place, Singapore 415926, Singapore
2
Department of Petrology and Economic Geology, Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), Øster Voldgade 10, DK-1350 Copenhagen K, Denmark
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Minerals 2019, 9(11), 665; https://doi.org/10.3390/min9110665
Received: 14 August 2019 / Revised: 24 October 2019 / Accepted: 25 October 2019 / Published: 29 October 2019
Effective energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis (EDX) with a scanning electron microscope of fine-grained materials (submicrometer scale) is hampered by the interaction volume of the primary electron beam, whose diameter usually is larger than the size of the grains to be analyzed. Therefore, mixed signals of the chemistry of individual grains are expected, and EDX is commonly not applied to such fine-grained material. However, by applying a low primary beam acceleration voltage, combined with a large aperture, and a dedicated mineral classification in the mineral library employed by the Zeiss Mineralogic software platform, mixed signals could be deconvoluted down to a size of 200 nm. In this way, EDX and automated quantitative mineralogy can be applied to investigations of submicrometer-sized grains. It is shown here that reliable quantitative mineralogy and grain size distribution assessment can be made based on an example of fault gouge with a heterogenous mineralogy collected from Ikkattup nunaa Island, southern West Greenland. View Full-Text
Keywords: scanning electron microscopy (SEM); automated quantitative analysis (AQM); spectrum quantification; signal deconvolution; fault gouge; 200-nm resolution; grain size distribution; Ikkattup nunaa; mineral maps; submicrometer scanning electron microscopy (SEM); automated quantitative analysis (AQM); spectrum quantification; signal deconvolution; fault gouge; 200-nm resolution; grain size distribution; Ikkattup nunaa; mineral maps; submicrometer
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MDPI and ACS Style

Graham, S.; Keulen, N. Nanoscale Automated Quantitative Mineralogy: A 200-nm Quantitative Mineralogy Assessment of Fault Gouge Using Mineralogic. Minerals 2019, 9, 665.

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