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Article

Insights and Lessons from 3D Geological and Geophysical Modeling of Mineralized Terranes in Tasmania

1
Department of State Growth, Mineral Resources Tasmania, Rosny Park 7018, Australia
2
Centre for Ore Deposits and Earth Sciences (CODES), School of Natural Sciences (Earth Sciences), University of Tasmania, Private Bag 79, Hobart 7001, Australia
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Pierpaolo Guarnieri
Minerals 2021, 11(11), 1195; https://doi.org/10.3390/min11111195
Received: 17 September 2021 / Revised: 12 October 2021 / Accepted: 14 October 2021 / Published: 27 October 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 3D-Modelling of Crustal Structures and Mineral Deposit Systems)
Over the last two decades, Mineral Resources Tasmania has been developing regional 3D geological and geophysical models for prospective terranes at a range of scales and extents as part of its suite of precompetitive geoscience products. These have evolved in conjunction with developments in 3D modeling technology over that time. Commencing with a jurisdiction-wide 3D model in 2002, subsequent modeling projects have explored a range of approaches to the development of 3D models as a vehicle for the better synthesis and understanding of controls on ore-forming processes and prospectivity. These models are built on high-quality potential field data sets. Assignment of bulk properties derived from previous well-constrained geophysical modeling and an extensive rock property database has enabled the identification of anomalous features that have been targeted for follow-up mineral exploration. An aspect of this effort has been the generation of uncertainty estimates for model features. Our experience is that this process can be hindered by models that are too large or too detailed to be interrogated easily, especially when modeling techniques do not readily permit significant geometric changes. The most effective 3D modeling workflow for insights into mineral exploration is that which facilitates the rapid hypothesis testing of a wide range of scenarios whilst satisfying the constraints of observed data. View Full-Text
Keywords: 3D modeling; potential field; gravity; magnetics; inversion 3D modeling; potential field; gravity; magnetics; inversion
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bombardieri, D.; Duffett, M.; McNeill, A.; Cracknell, M.; Reading, A. Insights and Lessons from 3D Geological and Geophysical Modeling of Mineralized Terranes in Tasmania. Minerals 2021, 11, 1195. https://doi.org/10.3390/min11111195

AMA Style

Bombardieri D, Duffett M, McNeill A, Cracknell M, Reading A. Insights and Lessons from 3D Geological and Geophysical Modeling of Mineralized Terranes in Tasmania. Minerals. 2021; 11(11):1195. https://doi.org/10.3390/min11111195

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bombardieri, Daniel, Mark Duffett, Andrew McNeill, Matthew Cracknell, and Anya Reading. 2021. "Insights and Lessons from 3D Geological and Geophysical Modeling of Mineralized Terranes in Tasmania" Minerals 11, no. 11: 1195. https://doi.org/10.3390/min11111195

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