Next Article in Journal
Marble Waste Valorization through Alkali Activation
Previous Article in Journal
Origin of Qinxi Silver Polymetallic Deposit in Southeast Coast, China: Evidences from H–O–S–Pb Isotopes and Mineral Rb–Sr Geochronology
Previous Article in Special Issue
Fracture Propagation and Morphology Due to Non-Aqueous Fracturing: Competing Roles between Fluid Characteristics and In Situ Stress State
 
 
Article

Advanced Geomechanical Model to Predict the Impact of CO2-Induced Microstructural Alterations on the Cohesive-Frictional Behavior of Mt. Simon Sandstone

1
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA
2
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA
3
Department of Civil, Architectural, & Environmental Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
4
Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90007, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Minerals 2021, 11(1), 38; https://doi.org/10.3390/min11010038
Received: 16 October 2020 / Revised: 21 December 2020 / Accepted: 23 December 2020 / Published: 31 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Deep Saline CO2 Sequestration: Mechanisms and Coupling Behaviours)
We investigated the influence of CO2-induced geochemical reactions on the cohesive-frictional properties of host rock within the context of CO2 storage in a saline aquifer and focused on the Mt. Simon sandstone. The research objective was to model geo-mechanical changes due to host rock exposure to CO2-saturated brine while accounting for heterogeneity, double-scale porosity, and granular structure. We formulated a three-level multi-scale model for host rocks. We conducted scanning electron microscopy analyses to probe the microstructure and grid nanoindentation to measure the mechanical response. We derived new nonlinear strength upscaling solutions to correlate the effective strength characteristics and the macroscopic yield surface to the micro-structure at the nano-, micro-, and meso-scales. Specifically, our theoretical model links CO2-induced microstructural alterations to a reduction in the size of the yield surface, and a drop in the value of the friction coefficient. In turn, regarding the Illinois Basin Decatur Project, the CO2-induced drop in friction coefficient is linked to an increase in the risk of fault slip and a higher probability of induced microseismicity during and after the end of CO2 underground injection operations. The theoretical model presented is essential for the geo-mechanical modeling of CO2 underground injection operations at multiple length-scales. View Full-Text
Keywords: CO2 geological storage; geochemical reactions; host rocks; cohesive-frictional behavior; induced microseismicity CO2 geological storage; geochemical reactions; host rocks; cohesive-frictional behavior; induced microseismicity
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Akono, A.-T.; Werth, C.; Shi, Z.; Jessen, K.; Tsotsis, T.T. Advanced Geomechanical Model to Predict the Impact of CO2-Induced Microstructural Alterations on the Cohesive-Frictional Behavior of Mt. Simon Sandstone. Minerals 2021, 11, 38. https://doi.org/10.3390/min11010038

AMA Style

Akono A-T, Werth C, Shi Z, Jessen K, Tsotsis TT. Advanced Geomechanical Model to Predict the Impact of CO2-Induced Microstructural Alterations on the Cohesive-Frictional Behavior of Mt. Simon Sandstone. Minerals. 2021; 11(1):38. https://doi.org/10.3390/min11010038

Chicago/Turabian Style

Akono, Ange-Therese, Charles Werth, Zhuofan Shi, Kristian Jessen, and Theodore T. Tsotsis. 2021. "Advanced Geomechanical Model to Predict the Impact of CO2-Induced Microstructural Alterations on the Cohesive-Frictional Behavior of Mt. Simon Sandstone" Minerals 11, no. 1: 38. https://doi.org/10.3390/min11010038

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop