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Article

Variation and Correlations in Departures from Symmetry of Brain Torque, Humeral Morphology and Handedness in an Archaeological Sample of Homo sapiens

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PaleoFED team, UMR 7194, CNRS, Département Homme et Environnement, Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle, Musée de l’Homme, 17, Place du Trocadéro, 75016 Paris, France
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Department of African Zoology, Royal Museum for Central Africa, 3080 Tervuren, Belgium
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PalaeoHub, Department of Archaeology, University of York, Wentworth Way, Heslington, York YO10 5DD, UK
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Department of Zoology, Poznań University of Life Sciences, Wojska Polskiego 71C, 60-625 Poznań, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Symmetry 2020, 12(3), 432; https://doi.org/10.3390/sym12030432
Received: 28 January 2020 / Revised: 2 March 2020 / Accepted: 3 March 2020 / Published: 7 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fluctuating asymmetry: A predictor of human life history outcomes)
The anatomical asymmetries of the human brain are the subject of a great deal of scientific interest because of their links with handedness and lateralized cognitive functions. Information about lateralization in humans is also available from the post-cranial skeleton, particularly the arm bones, in which differences in size and shape are related to hand/arm preference. Our objective here is to characterize the possible correlations between the endocranial and post-cranial asymmetries of an archaeological sample. This, in turn, will allow us to try to identify and interpret prospective functional traits in the archaeological and fossil records. We observe that directional asymmetry (DA) is present both for some endocranial and humeral traits because of brain lateralization and lateralized behaviors, while patterns of fluctuating asymmetry (FA) vary. The combined study of these anatomical elements and of their asymmetries can shed light on the ways in which the body responds to dependent asymmetrical stimuli across biologically independent anatomical areas. Variations in FA are, in this context, indicators of differences in answers to lateralized factors. Humeri tend to show a much larger range of variation than the endocast. We show that important but complex information may be extracted from the combined study of the endocast and the arms in an archaeological sample of Homo sapiens. View Full-Text
Keywords: lateralization; directional asymmetry; fluctuating asymmetry; brain endocast; biomechanical properties; human behavior lateralization; directional asymmetry; fluctuating asymmetry; brain endocast; biomechanical properties; human behavior
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MDPI and ACS Style

Balzeau, A.; Ball-Albessard, L.; Kubicka, A.M. Variation and Correlations in Departures from Symmetry of Brain Torque, Humeral Morphology and Handedness in an Archaeological Sample of Homo sapiens. Symmetry 2020, 12, 432. https://doi.org/10.3390/sym12030432

AMA Style

Balzeau A, Ball-Albessard L, Kubicka AM. Variation and Correlations in Departures from Symmetry of Brain Torque, Humeral Morphology and Handedness in an Archaeological Sample of Homo sapiens. Symmetry. 2020; 12(3):432. https://doi.org/10.3390/sym12030432

Chicago/Turabian Style

Balzeau, Antoine, Lou Ball-Albessard, and Anna M. Kubicka. 2020. "Variation and Correlations in Departures from Symmetry of Brain Torque, Humeral Morphology and Handedness in an Archaeological Sample of Homo sapiens" Symmetry 12, no. 3: 432. https://doi.org/10.3390/sym12030432

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