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Article

Lateral Asymmetry of Brain and Behaviour in the Zebra Finch, Taeniopygia guttata

School of Science and Technology, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Symmetry 2018, 10(12), 679; https://doi.org/10.3390/sym10120679
Received: 1 November 2018 / Revised: 28 November 2018 / Accepted: 29 November 2018 / Published: 1 December 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Left Versus Right Asymmetries of Brain and Behaviour)
Lateralisation of eye use indicates differential specialisation of the brain hemispheres. We tested eye use by zebra finches to view a model predator, a monitor lizard, and compared this to eye use to view a non-threatening visual stimulus, a jar. We used a modified method of scoring eye preference of zebra finches, since they often alternate fixation of a stimulus with the lateral, monocular visual field of one eye and then the other, known as biocular alternating fixation. We found a significant and consistent preference to view the lizard using the left lateral visual field, and no significant eye preference to view the jar. This finding is consistent with specialisation of the left eye system, and right hemisphere, to attend and respond to predators, as found in two other avian species and also in non-avian vertebrates. Our results were considered together with hemispheric differences in the zebra finch for processing, producing, and learning song, and with evidence of right-eye preference in visual searching and courtship behaviour. We conclude that the zebra finch brain has the same general pattern of asymmetry for visual processing as found in other vertebrates and suggest that, contrary to earlier indications from research on lateralisation of song, this may also be the case for auditory processing. View Full-Text
Keywords: asymmetry of brain function; lateralised behaviour; song; songbirds; zebra finch; predator inspection; eye preference; hemisphere differences; monocular viewing; general pattern of lateralisation asymmetry of brain function; lateralised behaviour; song; songbirds; zebra finch; predator inspection; eye preference; hemisphere differences; monocular viewing; general pattern of lateralisation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Rogers, L.J.; Koboroff, A.; Kaplan, G. Lateral Asymmetry of Brain and Behaviour in the Zebra Finch, Taeniopygia guttata. Symmetry 2018, 10, 679. https://doi.org/10.3390/sym10120679

AMA Style

Rogers LJ, Koboroff A, Kaplan G. Lateral Asymmetry of Brain and Behaviour in the Zebra Finch, Taeniopygia guttata. Symmetry. 2018; 10(12):679. https://doi.org/10.3390/sym10120679

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rogers, Lesley J., Adam Koboroff, and Gisela Kaplan. 2018. "Lateral Asymmetry of Brain and Behaviour in the Zebra Finch, Taeniopygia guttata" Symmetry 10, no. 12: 679. https://doi.org/10.3390/sym10120679

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