Next Article in Journal
Analysis of Factors Influencing the Urban Carrying Capacity of the Shanghai Metropolis Based on a Multiscale Geographically Weighted Regression (MGWR) Model
Previous Article in Journal
Comparative Analysis of the Factors Influencing Land Use Change for Emerging Industry and Traditional Industry: A Case Study of Shenzhen City, China
Previous Article in Special Issue
Evidence of Similarities in Ecosystem Service Flow across the Rural-Urban Spectrum
Review

The Flows of Nature to People, and of People to Nature: Applying Movement Concepts to Ecosystem Services

1
School of Natural Sciences, Bangor University, Bangor LL57 2DG, UK
2
NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Wallingford OX10 8BB, UK
3
Wageningen University and Research, 6708 PB Wageningen, The Netherlands
4
Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas-Centro de Edafología y Biología Aplicada del Segura (CEBAS-CSIC), E-30100 Murcia, Spain
5
Rothamsted Research, Harpenden AL5 2JQ, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Dagmar Haase and David J. Abson
Land 2021, 10(6), 576; https://doi.org/10.3390/land10060576
Received: 27 April 2021 / Revised: 21 May 2021 / Accepted: 25 May 2021 / Published: 29 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exploring the Relationships between Land Use and Ecosystem Services)
To date, the provision of ecosystem services has largely been estimated based on spatial patterns of land cover alone, using benefit transfer analysis. Although it is increasingly being recognised that the distribution of the human population affects whether a potential service translates into a realised service, this misses key steps in the process and assumes that everyone accesses ecosystem services in the same way. Here we describe a conceptual approach to ecosystem services in terms of movement and flows. We highlight that ecosystem service flows can be broken down into ‘nature to people’ (the movement of nature towards beneficiaries) and ‘people to nature’ (the movement of beneficiaries towards nature). The former has been relatively well described. Here, we explore the latter by reviewing research on human migration, animal foraging and landscape connectivity. We assess if and how existing theories might be useful in describing how people seek out ecosystem services. We consider some of the ways in which flows of people to nature can be measured. Such measurements may reveal which movement theories best represent how people seek out and access ecosystem services. Overall, our review aims to improve the future modelling of ecosystem services by more explicitly considering how people access potential services and therefore realise them. View Full-Text
Keywords: access; connectivity; ecosystem service; flow; foraging; migration; movement; potential; realised; use access; connectivity; ecosystem service; flow; foraging; migration; movement; potential; realised; use
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Dolan, R.; Bullock, J.M.; Jones, J.P.G.; Athanasiadis, I.N.; Martinez-Lopez, J.; Willcock, S. The Flows of Nature to People, and of People to Nature: Applying Movement Concepts to Ecosystem Services. Land 2021, 10, 576. https://doi.org/10.3390/land10060576

AMA Style

Dolan R, Bullock JM, Jones JPG, Athanasiadis IN, Martinez-Lopez J, Willcock S. The Flows of Nature to People, and of People to Nature: Applying Movement Concepts to Ecosystem Services. Land. 2021; 10(6):576. https://doi.org/10.3390/land10060576

Chicago/Turabian Style

Dolan, Rachel; Bullock, James M.; Jones, Julia P.G.; Athanasiadis, Ioannis N.; Martinez-Lopez, Javier; Willcock, Simon. 2021. "The Flows of Nature to People, and of People to Nature: Applying Movement Concepts to Ecosystem Services" Land 10, no. 6: 576. https://doi.org/10.3390/land10060576

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop