Next Article in Journal
Land Use and Management Effects on Sustainable Sugarcane-Derived Bioenergy
Next Article in Special Issue
Optimal Irrigation Regime for Woody Species Potentially Suitable for Effective and Sustainable Afforestation in the Desert Region of Mongolia
Previous Article in Journal
An Approach to Resolve Inconsistencies of Data in the Cadastre
Previous Article in Special Issue
Forest and Landscape Restoration: A Review Emphasizing Principles, Concepts, and Practices
Open AccessCommunication

Native Plant Production in Chile. Is It Possible to Achieve Restoration Goals by 2035?

1
Instituto Forestal, Centro Tecnológico de la Planta Forestal, Región del Biobío 7770223, Chile
2
Instituto de Ciencias Agro-alimentarias, Animales y Ambientales (ICA3), Campus Colchagua, Universidad de O’Higgins, San Fernando 2840440, Chile
3
USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Moscow, ID 83843, USA
4
Instituto Forestal, Oficina Chiloé, Castro 5700000, Chile
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Land 2021, 10(1), 71; https://doi.org/10.3390/land10010071
Received: 22 December 2020 / Revised: 9 January 2021 / Accepted: 11 January 2021 / Published: 14 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Forest Landscape Restoration: Strategies, Challenges, and Impacts)
Facing rapid loss of biodiversity as a consequence of climate change, Chile has formally pledged to restore 600,000 ha of native forest by 2035. This effort, however, has not considered the amount and quality of native plants required to meet this pledge. Thus, we examined data collected during the annual, government-conducted census of small- and medium-sized nurseries from central Chile, which account for 78% of the nation’s total plant production, to assess if current production is sufficient to meet Chile´s restoration needs. We coupled this with data collected during our series of ongoing research projects to determine if nurseries are currently meeting minimum seedling quality standards based on morpho-physiological attributes. Our four-year analysis (2016–2019) shows that the number of native seedlings has increased by only 4%, but because only 19% of nursery managers have training, just 29% of all seedlings meet quality criteria for restoration. Thus, under the current rate and quality of plant production, meeting restoration pledges desired by the year 2035 would not be achieved until 2181. This timeline can be accelerated through an urgent expansion of nursery space, implementation of a continuous program for technology and knowledge transference, and strong support through governmental policies. View Full-Text
Keywords: nurseries; management practices; international agreement; seedling attributes nurseries; management practices; international agreement; seedling attributes
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Acevedo, M.; Álvarez-Maldini, C.; Dumroese, R.K.; Bannister, J.R.; Cartes, E.; González, M. Native Plant Production in Chile. Is It Possible to Achieve Restoration Goals by 2035? Land 2021, 10, 71. https://doi.org/10.3390/land10010071

AMA Style

Acevedo M, Álvarez-Maldini C, Dumroese RK, Bannister JR, Cartes E, González M. Native Plant Production in Chile. Is It Possible to Achieve Restoration Goals by 2035? Land. 2021; 10(1):71. https://doi.org/10.3390/land10010071

Chicago/Turabian Style

Acevedo, Manuel; Álvarez-Maldini, Carolina; Dumroese, R. K.; Bannister, Jan R.; Cartes, Eduardo; González, Marta. 2021. "Native Plant Production in Chile. Is It Possible to Achieve Restoration Goals by 2035?" Land 10, no. 1: 71. https://doi.org/10.3390/land10010071

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop