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Article

Stormwater Runoff Modelling in an Urban Catchment to Plan Risk Management for Contaminant Spills for Stormwater Harvesting

1
Science Technology, Engineering and Maths (STEM), Scarce Resources and Circular Economy (ScaRCE), Mawson Lakes Campus, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, SA 5095, Australia
2
CSIRO Land and Water, Waite Laboratories, Waite Rd., Urrbrae, SA 5064, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Fabrice Rodriguez and Jorge Gironás
Water 2021, 13(20), 2865; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13202865
Received: 27 August 2021 / Revised: 29 September 2021 / Accepted: 8 October 2021 / Published: 14 October 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrological Modeling in Urban Water Management)
Water quality is a key consideration for urban stormwater harvesting via aquifers. This study assessed catchment spill management options based on a calibrated dynamic wave routing model of stormwater flow in an urban catchment. The study used measured travel times, pluviometer and gauging station observations from 21 storms to calibrate a stormwater model to simulate transport of pollutants from spill locations to the point of harvest. The simulations considered the impact of spill locations, spill durations, storm intensities and storm durations on the pollutant concentration at the point of harvest and travel time of a pollutant spill to the harvesting point. During dry weather, spill events travelled slower than spills occurring during wet weather. For wet weather spills, the shortest travel times tended to occur in higher intensity storms with shorter duration, particularly when a spill occurred in the middle of the storm. Increasing the intensity of rainfall reduced the peak concentration of pollutant at the harvest point via dilution, but it also reduced the time of travel. On a practical level, due to the short response times in urban catchments, management of spills should be supported by automated detection/diversion systems to protect stormwater harvesting schemes. View Full-Text
Keywords: stormwater harvesting; catchment management; spill transport; managed aquifer recharge; SWMM modelling; risk assessment stormwater harvesting; catchment management; spill transport; managed aquifer recharge; SWMM modelling; risk assessment
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MDPI and ACS Style

Myers, B.; Awad, J.; Pezzaniti, D.; Gonzalez, D.; Page, D.; Dillon, P. Stormwater Runoff Modelling in an Urban Catchment to Plan Risk Management for Contaminant Spills for Stormwater Harvesting. Water 2021, 13, 2865. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13202865

AMA Style

Myers B, Awad J, Pezzaniti D, Gonzalez D, Page D, Dillon P. Stormwater Runoff Modelling in an Urban Catchment to Plan Risk Management for Contaminant Spills for Stormwater Harvesting. Water. 2021; 13(20):2865. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13202865

Chicago/Turabian Style

Myers, Baden, John Awad, David Pezzaniti, Dennis Gonzalez, Declan Page, and Peter Dillon. 2021. "Stormwater Runoff Modelling in an Urban Catchment to Plan Risk Management for Contaminant Spills for Stormwater Harvesting" Water 13, no. 20: 2865. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13202865

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