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Article

Contrasting Water Use, Stomatal Regulation, Embolism Resistance, and Drought Responses of Two Co-Occurring Mangroves

1
Guangxi Key Laboratory of Forest Ecology and Conservation, State Key Laboratory for Conservation and Utilization of Subtropical Agro-Bioresources, College of Forestry, Guangxi University, Daxuedonglu 100, Nanning 530004, China
2
School of Biology, University of Tasmania, Hobart 7001, Australia
3
Department of Biological Sciences, Institute of Environment, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199, USA
4
School of Biology and Ecology, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Luis Gimeno
Water 2021, 13(14), 1945; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13141945
Received: 15 June 2021 / Revised: 13 July 2021 / Accepted: 13 July 2021 / Published: 15 July 2021
The physiological mechanisms underlying drought responses are poorly documented in mangroves, which experience nearly constant exposure to saline water. We measured gas exchange, foliar abscisic acid (ABA) concentration, and vulnerability to embolism in a soil water-withholding experiment of two co-occurring mangroves, Avicennia marina (Forsskål) Vierhapper (Verbenaceae) and Bruguiera gymnorrhiza (L.) Savigny (Rhizophoraceae). A. marina showed higher photosynthesis and transpiration than B. gymnorrhiza under well-watered conditions. Cavitation resistance differed significantly between species, with 50% cavitation occurring at a water potential (P50) of −8.30 MPa for A. marina and −2.83 MPa for B. gymnorrhiza. This large difference in cavitation resistance was associated with differences in stomatal closure and leaf wilting. The rapid stomatal closure of B. gymnorrhiza was correlated with ABA accumulation as water potential declined. Meanwhile, stomatal closure and declining water potentials in A. marina were not associated with ABA accumulation. The safety margins, calculated as the difference between stomatal closure and embolism spread, differed between these two species (1.59 MPa for A. marina vs. 0.52 MPa for B. gymnorrhiza). Therefore, A. marina adopts a drought tolerance strategy with high cavitation resistance, while B. gymnorrhiza uses a drought avoidance-like strategy with ABA-related sensitive stomatal control to protect its vulnerable xylem. View Full-Text
Keywords: ABA; cavitation resistance; drought tolerance; hydraulic safety margin; stomatal regulation; gas exchange; salt management strategy ABA; cavitation resistance; drought tolerance; hydraulic safety margin; stomatal regulation; gas exchange; salt management strategy
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MDPI and ACS Style

Jiang, G.-F.; Brodribb, T.J.; Roddy, A.B.; Lei, J.-Y.; Si, H.-T.; Pahadi, P.; Zhang, Y.-J.; Cao, K.-F. Contrasting Water Use, Stomatal Regulation, Embolism Resistance, and Drought Responses of Two Co-Occurring Mangroves. Water 2021, 13, 1945. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13141945

AMA Style

Jiang G-F, Brodribb TJ, Roddy AB, Lei J-Y, Si H-T, Pahadi P, Zhang Y-J, Cao K-F. Contrasting Water Use, Stomatal Regulation, Embolism Resistance, and Drought Responses of Two Co-Occurring Mangroves. Water. 2021; 13(14):1945. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13141945

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jiang, Guo-Feng, Timothy J. Brodribb, Adam B. Roddy, Jin-Yan Lei, Huai-Tong Si, Pratima Pahadi, Yong-Jiang Zhang, and Kun-Fang Cao. 2021. "Contrasting Water Use, Stomatal Regulation, Embolism Resistance, and Drought Responses of Two Co-Occurring Mangroves" Water 13, no. 14: 1945. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13141945

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