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Article

Evolution of Storm Surges over the Little Ice Age Indicated by Aeolian Sand Records on the Coast of the Beibu Gulf, China

1
School of Geography and Planning, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275, China
2
School of Geography and Planning, Nanning Normal University, Nanning 530001, China
3
State Key Laboratory of Loess and Quaternary Geology, Institute of Earth Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xi’an 710061, China
4
School of Geography, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631, China
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School of Geography and Tourism, Huizhou University, Huizhou 516007, China
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Key Laboratory of Ocean and Marginal Sea Geology, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510301, China
7
School of Physics Science & Technology, Lingnan Normal University, Zhanjiang 524048, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Guobin Fu
Water 2021, 13(14), 1941; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13141941
Received: 10 June 2021 / Revised: 10 July 2021 / Accepted: 11 July 2021 / Published: 14 July 2021
The Wutou section, hereinafter referred to as “WTS”, lies in Jiangping, Guangxi Province, China (21°32′8.25″ N, 108°06′59.9″ E; thickness of 246 cm) and consists of fluvial-lacustrine facies and dune sands of the Late Holocene. This study reconstructed the evolution of storm surges along the coast of the Beibu Gulf, Guangxi over the Little Ice Age, based on three accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS)-14C, optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating ages, and the analyses of grain size and heavy minerals. The analysis results indicated that the storm sediments interspersed among aeolian sands, lagoon facies, and weak soil display a coarse mean grain size and poor sorting. The storm sediments also show high maturity of heavy minerals and low stability resulting from rapid accumulation due to storm surges originating from the land-facing side of the coastal dunes. Records of seven peak storm surge periods were recorded in the WTS over the past millennium and mainly occurred after 1400 AD, i.e., during the Little Ice Age. The peaks in storm surges, including the 14Paleostrom deposit (hereinafter referred to as “Pd”) (1425–1470AD), 10Pd (1655–1690AD), 6Pd (1790–1820AD), and 4Pd (1850–1885AD) approximately corresponded with the periods of minimum sunspot activity, suggesting that the periods of storm surge peaks revealed by the WTS were probably regulated to a great extent by solar activity. View Full-Text
Keywords: coastal aeolian sands; Beibu Gulf in Guangxi; over the Little Ice Age; storm surge; grain size coastal aeolian sands; Beibu Gulf in Guangxi; over the Little Ice Age; storm surge; grain size
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MDPI and ACS Style

Chen, Z.; Li, B.; Wang, F.; Du, S.; Niu, D.; Zhao, Y.; Si, Y. Evolution of Storm Surges over the Little Ice Age Indicated by Aeolian Sand Records on the Coast of the Beibu Gulf, China. Water 2021, 13, 1941. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13141941

AMA Style

Chen Z, Li B, Wang F, Du S, Niu D, Zhao Y, Si Y. Evolution of Storm Surges over the Little Ice Age Indicated by Aeolian Sand Records on the Coast of the Beibu Gulf, China. Water. 2021; 13(14):1941. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13141941

Chicago/Turabian Style

Chen, Zhi, Baosheng Li, Fengnian Wang, Shuhuan Du, Dongfeng Niu, Yinjun Zhao, and Yuejun Si. 2021. "Evolution of Storm Surges over the Little Ice Age Indicated by Aeolian Sand Records on the Coast of the Beibu Gulf, China" Water 13, no. 14: 1941. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13141941

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