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Article

Metabarcoding under Brine: Microbial Ecology of Five Hypersaline Lakes at Rottnest Island (WA, Australia)

1
Trace and Environmental DNA (TrEnD) Laboratory, School of Molecular and Life Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, WA 6102, Australia
2
Curtin Water Quality Research Centre, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845, Australia
3
Collections and Research Centre, Western Australian Museum, Welshpool, WA 6986, Australia
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School of Biological Sciences, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia
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Department of Life Sciences and Systems Biology, University of Torino, 10124 Torino, Italy
6
Lundbeck Foundation GeoGenetics Centre, GLOBE Institute, University of Copenhagen, Øster Voldgade 5-7, 1350 Copenhagen, Denmark
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Nickolai Shadrin, Elena Anufriieva and Gonzalo Gajardo
Water 2021, 13(14), 1899; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13141899
Received: 29 May 2021 / Revised: 5 July 2021 / Accepted: 6 July 2021 / Published: 9 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ecosystems of Inland Saline Waters)
Hypersaline ecosystems—aquatic environments where concentration of salt exceeds 35 g L−1—host microbial communities that are highly specialised to cope with these extreme conditions. However, our knowledge on the taxonomic diversity and functional metabolisms characterising microbial communities in the water columns of hypersaline ecosystems is still limited, and this may compromise the future preservation of these unique environments. DNA metabarcoding provides a reliable and affordable tool to investigate environmental dynamics of aquatic ecosystems, and its use in brine can be highly informative. Here, we make use of bacterial 16S metabarcoding techniques combined with hydrochemical analyses to investigate the microbial patterns (diversity and functions) from five hypersaline lakes located at Rottnest Island (WA). Our results indicate lake-driven microbial aquatic assemblages that are characterised by taxonomically and functionally moderately to extremely halophilic groups, with TDS (total dissolved solids) and alkalinity amongst the most influential parameters driving the community patterns. Overall, our findings suggest that DNA metabarcoding allows rapid but reliable ecological assessment of the hypersaline aquatic microbial communities at Rottnest Island. Further studies involving different hypersaline lakes across multiple seasons will help elucidate the full extent of the potential of this tool in brine. View Full-Text
Keywords: hypersaline; DNA metabarcoding; functional genetics; microbes; water; Rottnest Island hypersaline; DNA metabarcoding; functional genetics; microbes; water; Rottnest Island
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MDPI and ACS Style

Saccò, M.; White, N.E.; Campbell, M.; Allard, S.; Humphreys, W.F.; Pringle, P.; Sepanta, F.; Laini, A.; Allentoft, M.E. Metabarcoding under Brine: Microbial Ecology of Five Hypersaline Lakes at Rottnest Island (WA, Australia). Water 2021, 13, 1899. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13141899

AMA Style

Saccò M, White NE, Campbell M, Allard S, Humphreys WF, Pringle P, Sepanta F, Laini A, Allentoft ME. Metabarcoding under Brine: Microbial Ecology of Five Hypersaline Lakes at Rottnest Island (WA, Australia). Water. 2021; 13(14):1899. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13141899

Chicago/Turabian Style

Saccò, Mattia, Nicole E. White, Matthew Campbell, Sebastian Allard, William F. Humphreys, Paul Pringle, Farid Sepanta, Alex Laini, and Morten E. Allentoft 2021. "Metabarcoding under Brine: Microbial Ecology of Five Hypersaline Lakes at Rottnest Island (WA, Australia)" Water 13, no. 14: 1899. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13141899

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