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Depth–Sequential Investigation of Major Ions, δ18O, δ2H and δ13C in Fractured Aquifers of the St. Lawrence Lowlands (Quebec, Canada) Using Passive Samplers

1
Centre Geotop, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Faculty of Sciences, University of Quebec in Montreal, Montreal, QC H3C 3P8, Canada
2
Spiez Laboratory, Federal Office for Civil Protection, 3700 Spiez, Switzerland
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TechnoRem Inc., Laval, QC H7P 6G5, Canada
4
Envir’Eau–Puits Inc., Lévis, QC G7A 3V3, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Aldo Fiori
Water 2021, 13(13), 1806; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13131806
Received: 1 June 2021 / Revised: 26 June 2021 / Accepted: 28 June 2021 / Published: 29 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Hydrology)
General and isotopic geochemistry of groundwater is an essential tool to decipher hydrogeological contexts and flow paths. Different hydrogeochemical patterns may result from the inherent physical aquifer heterogeneity, which may go unnoticed without detailed investigations gathered from multilevel or multiple observation wells. An alternative to overcome the frequent unavailability of multiple wellbores at sites is to perform a detailed investigation on the single wellbore available. In this perspective, the aim of this study is to use passive samplers to sequentially collect groundwater at depths in long–screened wellbores. Such investigation is carried out for major ions and stable isotopes compositions (δ2H, δ18O, δ13C) at ten sites in the context of fractured carbonate aquifers of the St. Lawrence Lowlands (Quebec, Canada). The information gathered from the calco–carbonic system, major ions and stable isotopes report poorly stratified and evolved groundwater bodies. Contribution of water impacted by anthropogenic activities, such as road salts pollution and carbon sources from C4 vegetation, when they occur, are even observed at the greatest depths. Such observations suggest quick flow paths and efficient mixing conditions, which leads to significant contributions of contemporary groundwater bodies in the fractured aquifers investigated down to depths of about 100 m. Although physical aquifer investigation reported few and heterogeneously distributed fractures per wellbore, hydrogeochemical findings point to at overall well interconnected fracture networks in the aquifer and high vulnerability of groundwater, even at significant depths. View Full-Text
Keywords: passive water sampling; long screened wellbore; fractured aquifer; major ions chemistry; stable isotopes of water and of carbon; St. Lawrence lowlands passive water sampling; long screened wellbore; fractured aquifer; major ions chemistry; stable isotopes of water and of carbon; St. Lawrence lowlands
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MDPI and ACS Style

Meyzonnat, G.; Barbecot, F.; Corcho Alvarado, J.; Pinti, D.L.; Lauzon, J.-M.; McCormack, R. Depth–Sequential Investigation of Major Ions, δ18O, δ2H and δ13C in Fractured Aquifers of the St. Lawrence Lowlands (Quebec, Canada) Using Passive Samplers. Water 2021, 13, 1806. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13131806

AMA Style

Meyzonnat G, Barbecot F, Corcho Alvarado J, Pinti DL, Lauzon J-M, McCormack R. Depth–Sequential Investigation of Major Ions, δ18O, δ2H and δ13C in Fractured Aquifers of the St. Lawrence Lowlands (Quebec, Canada) Using Passive Samplers. Water. 2021; 13(13):1806. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13131806

Chicago/Turabian Style

Meyzonnat, Guillaume, Florent Barbecot, José Corcho Alvarado, Daniele L. Pinti, Jean-Marc Lauzon, and Renald McCormack. 2021. "Depth–Sequential Investigation of Major Ions, δ18O, δ2H and δ13C in Fractured Aquifers of the St. Lawrence Lowlands (Quebec, Canada) Using Passive Samplers" Water 13, no. 13: 1806. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13131806

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