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Article

A Data-Driven Surrogate Approach for the Temporal Stability Forecasting of Vegetation Covered Dikes

1
Geoscience & Engineering Department, Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Delft University of Technology, 2628 CN Delft, The Netherlands
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Unit Geo-Engineering, Deltares, 2629 HV Delft, The Netherlands
3
Geoscience & Remote Sensing Department, Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Delft University of Technology, 2628 CN Delft, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2021, 13(1), 107; https://doi.org/10.3390/w13010107
Received: 1 December 2020 / Revised: 27 December 2020 / Accepted: 29 December 2020 / Published: 5 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water-Induced Landslides: Prediction and Control)
Climatic conditions and vegetation cover influence water flux in a dike, and potentially the dike stability. A comprehensive numerical simulation is computationally too expensive to be used for the near real-time analysis of a dike network. Therefore, this study investigates a random forest (RF) regressor to build a data-driven surrogate for a numerical model to forecast the temporal macro-stability of dikes. To that end, daily inputs and outputs of a ten-year coupled numerical simulation of an idealised dike (2009–2019) are used to create a synthetic data set, comprising features that can be observed from a dike surface, with the calculated factor of safety (FoS) as the target variable. The data set before 2018 is split into training and testing sets to build and train the RF. The predicted FoS is strongly correlated with the numerical FoS for data that belong to the test set (before 2018). However, the trained model shows lower performance for data in the evaluation set (after 2018) if further surface cracking occurs. This proof-of-concept shows that a data-driven surrogate can be used to determine dike stability for conditions similar to the training data, which could be used to identify vulnerable locations in a dike network for further examination. View Full-Text
Keywords: machine learning; random forest; slope stability; numerical simulation; climate; vegetation machine learning; random forest; slope stability; numerical simulation; climate; vegetation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Jamalinia, E.; Tehrani, F.S.; Steele-Dunne, S.C.; Vardon, P.J. A Data-Driven Surrogate Approach for the Temporal Stability Forecasting of Vegetation Covered Dikes. Water 2021, 13, 107. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13010107

AMA Style

Jamalinia E, Tehrani FS, Steele-Dunne SC, Vardon PJ. A Data-Driven Surrogate Approach for the Temporal Stability Forecasting of Vegetation Covered Dikes. Water. 2021; 13(1):107. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13010107

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jamalinia, Elahe, Faraz S. Tehrani, Susan C. Steele-Dunne, and Philip J. Vardon 2021. "A Data-Driven Surrogate Approach for the Temporal Stability Forecasting of Vegetation Covered Dikes" Water 13, no. 1: 107. https://doi.org/10.3390/w13010107

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