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Efficacy of Inactivation of Human Enteroviruses by Dual-Wavelength Germicidal Ultraviolet (UV-C) Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs)

1
United States Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, 26 W. Martin Luther King Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45268, USA
2
Department of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering, University of Colorado Boulder, UCB 428, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
3
AquiSense Technologies, 4400 Olympic Boulevard, Erlanger, KY 41018, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Present address: Department of Environmental Microbiology, Eawag: Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, 8600 Dubendorf, Switzerland.
Present address: Weas Engineering, Inc., 17297 Oak Ridge Rd, Westfield, IN 46074, USA.
Water 2019, 11(6), 1131; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11061131
Received: 26 April 2019 / Revised: 24 May 2019 / Accepted: 28 May 2019 / Published: 30 May 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Water and Wastewater Monitoring and Treatment Technology)
The efficacy of germicidal ultraviolet (UV-C) light emitting diodes (LEDs) was evaluated for inactivating human enteroviruses included on the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)’s Contaminant Candidate List (CCL). A UV-C LED device, emitting at peaks of 260 nm and 280 nm and the combination of 260/280 nm together, was used to measure and compare potential synergistic effects of dual wavelengths for disinfecting viral organisms. The 260 nm LED proved to be the most effective at inactivating the CCL enteroviruses tested. To obtain 2-log10 inactivation credit for the 260 nm LED, the fluences (UV doses) required are approximately 8 mJ/cm2 for coxsackievirus A10 and poliovirus 1, 10 mJ/cm2 for enterovirus 70, and 13 mJ/cm2 for echovirus 30. No synergistic effect was detected when evaluating the log inactivation of enteroviruses irradiated by the dual-wavelength UV-C LEDs. View Full-Text
Keywords: ultraviolet disinfection; dual-wavelength; UV-C LEDs; human enteroviruses; viral inactivation efficacy; synergy ultraviolet disinfection; dual-wavelength; UV-C LEDs; human enteroviruses; viral inactivation efficacy; synergy
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Woo, H.; Beck, S.E.; Boczek, L.A.; Carlson, K.M.; Brinkman, N.E.; Linden, K.G.; Lawal, O.R.; Hayes, S.L.; Ryu, H. Efficacy of Inactivation of Human Enteroviruses by Dual-Wavelength Germicidal Ultraviolet (UV-C) Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs). Water 2019, 11, 1131.

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