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Open AccessArticle

Investigations of Museum Indoor Microclimate and Air Quality. Case Study from Romania

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Department of Geography, Tourism and Territorial Planning, Faculty of Geography, Tourism and Sport, University of Oradea, 1 Universitatii Street, 410087 Oradea, Romania
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Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, University of Oradea, 10 Piața 1 Decembrie Street, 410073 Oradea, Romania
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Department of Textiles, Leather and Industrial Management, Faculty of Energy Engineering and Industrial Management, University of Oradea, 4 Barbu Stefanescu Delavrancea Street, 410058 Oradea, Romania
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Faculty of Environment Protection, University of Oradea, Gen Magheru 26 Street, 410048 Oradea, Romania
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Faculty of Geography, Babes-Bolyai University, Sighetu Marmatiei Extension, 6 Avram Iancu Street, 437500 Sighetu Marmatiei, Romania
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Faculty of Geography, Babes-Bolyai University, 5-6 Clinicilor Street, 400006 Cluj Napoca, Romania
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Department of Physical and Economic Geography, Faculty of Science, L.N. Gumilyov Eurasian National University, 2 Satpayev Street, Nur-Sultan 010008, Kazakhstan
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Institute of Geography, Faculty of Oceanography and Geography, University of Gdansk, 80-309 Gdansk, Poland
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Elisabete Carolino
Atmosphere 2021, 12(2), 286; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos12020286
Received: 30 December 2020 / Revised: 10 February 2021 / Accepted: 17 February 2021 / Published: 23 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Indoor Air Quality—What Is Known and What Needs to Be Done)
Poor air quality inside museums is one of the main causes influencing the state of conservation of exhibits. Even if they are mostly placed in a controlled environment because of their construction materials, the exhibits can be very vulnerable to the influence of the internal microclimate. As a consequence, museum exhibits must be protected from potential negative effects. In order to prevent and stop the process of damage of the exhibits, monitoring the main parameters of the microclimate (especially temperature, humidity, and brightness) and keeping them in strict values is extremely important. The present study refers to the investigations and analysis of air quality inside a museum, located in a heritage building, from Romania. The paper focuses on monitoring and analysing temperature of air and walls, relative humidity (RH), CO2, brightness and particulate matters (PM), formaldehyde (HCHO), and total volatile organic compounds (TVOC). The monitoring was carried out in the Summer–Autumn 2020 Campaign, in two different exhibition areas (first floor and basement) and the main warehouse where the exhibits are kept and restored. The analyses aimed both at highlighting the hazard induced by the poor air quality inside the museum that the exhibits face. The results show that this environment is potentially harmful to both exposed items and people. Therefore, the number of days in which the ideal conditions in terms of temperature and RH are met are quite few, the concentration of suspended particles, formaldehyde, and total volatile organic compounds often exceed the limit allowed by the international standards in force. The results represent the basis for the development and implementation of strategies for long-term conservation of exhibits and to ensure a clean environment for employees, restorers, and visitors. View Full-Text
Keywords: indoor air quality; environmental monitoring; cultural heritage; museum exhibitions; preventive conservation; human health indoor air quality; environmental monitoring; cultural heritage; museum exhibitions; preventive conservation; human health
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ilieș, D.C.; Marcu, F.; Caciora, T.; Indrie, L.; Ilieș, A.; Albu, A.; Costea, M.; Burtă, L.; Baias, Ș.; Ilieș, M.; Sandor, M.; Herman, G.V.; Hodor, N.; Ilieș, G.; Berdenov, Z.; Huniadi, A.; Wendt, J.A. Investigations of Museum Indoor Microclimate and Air Quality. Case Study from Romania. Atmosphere 2021, 12, 286. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos12020286

AMA Style

Ilieș DC, Marcu F, Caciora T, Indrie L, Ilieș A, Albu A, Costea M, Burtă L, Baias Ș, Ilieș M, Sandor M, Herman GV, Hodor N, Ilieș G, Berdenov Z, Huniadi A, Wendt JA. Investigations of Museum Indoor Microclimate and Air Quality. Case Study from Romania. Atmosphere. 2021; 12(2):286. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos12020286

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ilieș, Dorina C.; Marcu, Florin; Caciora, Tudor; Indrie, Liliana; Ilieș, Alexandru; Albu, Adina; Costea, Monica; Burtă, Ligia; Baias, Ștefan; Ilieș, Marin; Sandor, Mircea; Herman, Grigore V.; Hodor, Nicolaie; Ilieș, Gabriela; Berdenov, Zharas; Huniadi, Anca; Wendt, Jan A. 2021. "Investigations of Museum Indoor Microclimate and Air Quality. Case Study from Romania" Atmosphere 12, no. 2: 286. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos12020286

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