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Article

Local and Remote Sources of Airborne Suspended Particulate Matter in the Antarctic Region

1
Laser Lab, Chemistry & Environment Group, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Zaragoza, Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain
2
Laser Chemistry Research Group, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Complutense University of Madrid, Plaza de Ciencias 1, 28040 Madrid, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Atmosphere 2020, 11(4), 373; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11040373
Received: 29 March 2020 / Revised: 6 April 2020 / Accepted: 8 April 2020 / Published: 10 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sources and Composition of Ambient Particulate Matter)
Quantification of suspended particulate matter (SPM) measurements—together with statistical tools, polar contour maps and backward air mass trajectory analyses—were implemented to better understand the main local and remote sources of contamination in this pristine region. Field campaigns were carried out during the austral summer of 2016–2017 at the “Gabriel de Castilla” Spanish Antarctic Research Station, located on Deception Island (South Shetland Islands, Antarctic). Aerosols were deposited in an air filter through a low-volume sampler and chemically analysed using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES). Elements such as Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na, P, S, Cu, Pb, Sr, Ti, Zn, Hf, Zr, V, As, Ti, Mn, Sn and Cr were identified. The statistical tools together with their correlations (Sr/Na, Al/Ti, Al/Mn, Al/Sr, Al/Pb, K/P) suggest a potentially significant role of terrestrial inputs for Al, Ti, Mn, Sr and Pb; marine environments for Sr and Na; and biological inputs for K and P. Polar contour graphical maps allowed reproducing wind maps, revealing the biological local distribution of K and P (penguin colony). Additionally, backward trajectory analysis confirmed previous affirmations and atmospheric air masses following the Antarctic circumpolar pattern. View Full-Text
Keywords: Antarctic region; Deception Island; atmospheric aerosols; particulate matter; statistical tools; backward trajectories; polar contour maps Antarctic region; Deception Island; atmospheric aerosols; particulate matter; statistical tools; backward trajectories; polar contour maps
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MDPI and ACS Style

Marina-Montes, C.; Pérez-Arribas, L.V.; Anzano, J.; Cáceres, J.O. Local and Remote Sources of Airborne Suspended Particulate Matter in the Antarctic Region. Atmosphere 2020, 11, 373. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11040373

AMA Style

Marina-Montes C, Pérez-Arribas LV, Anzano J, Cáceres JO. Local and Remote Sources of Airborne Suspended Particulate Matter in the Antarctic Region. Atmosphere. 2020; 11(4):373. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11040373

Chicago/Turabian Style

Marina-Montes, César, Luis V. Pérez-Arribas, Jesús Anzano, and Jorge O. Cáceres. 2020. "Local and Remote Sources of Airborne Suspended Particulate Matter in the Antarctic Region" Atmosphere 11, no. 4: 373. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11040373

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