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Article

Determining the Impact of Wildland Fires on Ground Level Ambient Ozone Levels in California

1
Health Sciences Research Institute, University of California, Merced, 5200 N. Lake Road, Merced, CA 95343, USA
2
USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station, 800 Buchanan St., Albany, CA 94706, USA
3
USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Region, 351 Pacu Lane, Bishop, CA 93514, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Atmosphere 2020, 11(10), 1131; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11101131
Received: 14 September 2020 / Revised: 26 September 2020 / Accepted: 16 October 2020 / Published: 21 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Statistical Approaches to Investigate Air Quality)
Wildland fire smoke is visible and detectable with remote sensing technology. Using this technology to assess ground level pollutants and the impacts to human health and exposure is more difficult. We found the presence of satellite derived smoke plumes for more than a couple of hours in the previous three days has significant impact on the chances of ground level ozone values exceeding the norm. While the magnitude of the impact will depend on characteristics of fires such as size, location, time in transport, or ozone precursors produced by the fire, we demonstrate that information on satellite derived smoke plumes together with site specific regression models provide useful information for supporting causal relationship between smoke from fire and ozone exceedances of the norm. Our results indicated that fire seasons increasing the median ozone level by 15 ppb. However, they seem to have little impact on the metric used for regulatory compliance, in particular at urban sites, except possibly during the 2008 forest fires in California. View Full-Text
Keywords: wildland fire smoke; autoregressive model; exceptional events; estimating ozone norms wildland fire smoke; autoregressive model; exceptional events; estimating ozone norms
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MDPI and ACS Style

Cisneros, R.; K. Preisler, H.; Schweizer, D.; Gharibi, H. Determining the Impact of Wildland Fires on Ground Level Ambient Ozone Levels in California. Atmosphere 2020, 11, 1131. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11101131

AMA Style

Cisneros R, K. Preisler H, Schweizer D, Gharibi H. Determining the Impact of Wildland Fires on Ground Level Ambient Ozone Levels in California. Atmosphere. 2020; 11(10):1131. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11101131

Chicago/Turabian Style

Cisneros, Ricardo, Haiganoush K. Preisler, Donald Schweizer, and Hamed Gharibi. 2020. "Determining the Impact of Wildland Fires on Ground Level Ambient Ozone Levels in California" Atmosphere 11, no. 10: 1131. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11101131

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