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Article

Atmospheric Dry Deposition of Water-Soluble Nitrogen to the Subarctic Western North Pacific Ocean during Summer

1
Korea Polar Research Institute, 26 Songdomirae-ro Yeonsu-gu, Incheon 21990, Korea
2
Department of Marine Science, Incheon National University, Incheon 22012, Korea
3
Department of Earth System Science, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA
4
Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0819, Japan
5
Department of Polar Sciences, University of Science and Technology (UST), Incheon 21990, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Atmosphere 2019, 10(7), 351; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10070351
Received: 23 May 2019 / Revised: 20 June 2019 / Accepted: 24 June 2019 / Published: 26 June 2019
To estimate dry deposition flux of atmospheric water-soluble nitrogen (N), including ammonium (NH4+), nitrate (NO3), and water-soluble organic nitrogen (WSON), aerosol samples were collected over the subarctic western North Pacific Ocean in the summer of 2016 aboard the Korean icebreaker IBR/V Araon. During the cruise, concentrations of NH4+, NO3, and WSON in bulk (fine + coarse) aerosols ranged from 0.768 to 25.3, 0.199 to 5.94, and 0.116 to 14.7 nmol m−3, respectively. Contributions of NH4+, NO3, and WSON to total water-soluble N represented ~74%, ~17%, and ~9%, respectively. Water-soluble N concentrations showed a strong gradient from the East Asian continent to the subarctic western North Pacific Ocean, indicating that water-soluble N species were mainly derived from anthropogenic or terrestrial sources. During sea fog events, coarse mode NO3 was likely to be scavenged more efficiently by fog droplets than fine mode NO3; besides, WSON was detected only in fine mode, suggesting that there may have been a significant influence of sea fog on WSON, such as the photochemical conversion of WSON into inorganic N. Mean dry deposition flux for water-soluble total N (6.3 ± 9.4 µmol m−2 d−1) over the subarctic western North Pacific Ocean was estimated to support a minimum carbon uptake of 42 ± 62 µmol C m−2d−1 by using the Redfield C/N ratio of 6.625. View Full-Text
Keywords: ammonium; nitrate; water-soluble organic nitrogen; influence of sea fog on atmospheric nitrogen; atmospheric nitrogen deposition; subarctic western North Pacific Ocean ammonium; nitrate; water-soluble organic nitrogen; influence of sea fog on atmospheric nitrogen; atmospheric nitrogen deposition; subarctic western North Pacific Ocean
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MDPI and ACS Style

Jung, J.; Han, B.; Rodriguez, B.; Miyazaki, Y.; Chung, H.Y.; Kim, K.; Choi, J.-O.; Park, K.; Kim, I.-N.; Kim, S.; Yang, E.J.; Kang, S.-H. Atmospheric Dry Deposition of Water-Soluble Nitrogen to the Subarctic Western North Pacific Ocean during Summer. Atmosphere 2019, 10, 351. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10070351

AMA Style

Jung J, Han B, Rodriguez B, Miyazaki Y, Chung HY, Kim K, Choi J-O, Park K, Kim I-N, Kim S, Yang EJ, Kang S-H. Atmospheric Dry Deposition of Water-Soluble Nitrogen to the Subarctic Western North Pacific Ocean during Summer. Atmosphere. 2019; 10(7):351. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10070351

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jung, Jinyoung, Byeol Han, Blanca Rodriguez, Yuzo Miyazaki, Hyun Y. Chung, Kitae Kim, Jung-Ok Choi, Keyhong Park, II-Nam Kim, Saewung Kim, Eun J. Yang, and Sung-Ho Kang. 2019. "Atmospheric Dry Deposition of Water-Soluble Nitrogen to the Subarctic Western North Pacific Ocean during Summer" Atmosphere 10, no. 7: 351. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10070351

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