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Article

Household Dust: Loadings and PM10-Bound Plasticizers and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

1
Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies (CESAM), Department of Environment, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
2
Department of Physics, IMARENAB University of León, 24071 León, Spain
3
Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA-CSIC), 08034 Barcelona, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Atmosphere 2019, 10(12), 785; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10120785
Received: 28 October 2019 / Revised: 3 December 2019 / Accepted: 3 December 2019 / Published: 6 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Atmospheric Aerosols: Sources, Analysis and Effects)
Residential dust is recognized as a major source of environmental contaminants, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and plasticizers, such as phthalic acid esters (PAEs). A sampling campaign was carried out to characterize the dust fraction of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter smaller than 10 µm (PM10), using an in situ resuspension chamber in three rooms (kitchen, living room, and bedroom) of four Spanish houses. Two samples per room were collected with, at least, a one-week interval. The PM10 samples were analyzed for their carbonaceous content by a thermo-optical technique and, after solvent extraction, for 20 PAHs, 8 PAEs and one non-phthalate plasticizer (DEHA) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. In general, higher dust loads were observed for parquet flooring as compared with tile. The highest dust loads were obtained for rugs. Total carbon accounted for 9.3 to 51 wt% of the PM10 mass. Plasticizer mass fractions varied from 5 µg g−1 to 17 mg g−1 PM10, whereas lower contributions were registered for PAHs (0.98 to 116 µg g−1). The plasticizer and PAH daily intakes for children and adults via dust ingestion were estimated to be three to four orders of magnitude higher than those via inhalation and dermal contact. The thoracic fraction of household dust was estimated to contribute to an excess of 7.2 to 14 per million people new cancer cases, which exceeds the acceptable risk of one per million. View Full-Text
Keywords: resuspension; household dust; PM10; organic and elemental carbon; phthalic acid esters; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons resuspension; household dust; PM10; organic and elemental carbon; phthalic acid esters; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons
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MDPI and ACS Style

Vicente, E.D.; Vicente, A.; Nunes, T.; Calvo, A.; del Blanco-Alegre, C.; Oduber, F.; Castro, A.; Fraile, R.; Amato, F.; Alves, C. Household Dust: Loadings and PM10-Bound Plasticizers and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons. Atmosphere 2019, 10, 785. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10120785

AMA Style

Vicente ED, Vicente A, Nunes T, Calvo A, del Blanco-Alegre C, Oduber F, Castro A, Fraile R, Amato F, Alves C. Household Dust: Loadings and PM10-Bound Plasticizers and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons. Atmosphere. 2019; 10(12):785. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10120785

Chicago/Turabian Style

Vicente, E. D., A. Vicente, T. Nunes, A. Calvo, C. del Blanco-Alegre, F. Oduber, A. Castro, R. Fraile, F. Amato, and C. Alves. 2019. "Household Dust: Loadings and PM10-Bound Plasticizers and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons" Atmosphere 10, no. 12: 785. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10120785

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