Next Article in Journal
Investigating the Behaviour of Human Thermal Indices under Divergent Atmospheric Conditions: A Sensitivity Analysis Approach
Previous Article in Journal
A Violently Tornadic Supercell Thunderstorm Simulation Spanning a Quarter-Trillion Grid Volumes: Computational Challenges, I/O Framework, and Visualizations of Tornadogenesis
Previous Article in Special Issue
Differences in Model Performance and Source Sensitivities for Sulfate Aerosol Resulting from Updates of the Aqueous- and Gas-Phase Oxidation Pathways for a Winter Pollution Episode in Tokyo, Japan
Open AccessArticle

Capturing Plume Rise and Dispersion with a Coupled Large-Eddy Simulation: Case Study of a Prescribed Burn

Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Atmosphere 2019, 10(10), 579; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10100579
Received: 16 August 2019 / Revised: 21 September 2019 / Accepted: 23 September 2019 / Published: 25 September 2019
Current understanding of the buoyant rise and subsequent dispersion of smoke due to wildfires has been limited by the complexity of interactions between fire behavior and atmospheric conditions, as well as the uncertainty in model evaluation data. To assess the feasibility of using numerical models to address this knowledge gap, we designed a large-eddy simulation of a real-life prescribed burn using a coupled semi-emperical fire–atmosphere model. We used observational data to evaluate the simulated smoke plume, as well as to identify sources of model biases. The results suggest that the rise and dispersion of fire emissions are reasonably captured by the model, subject to accurate surface thermal forcing and relatively steady atmospheric conditions. Overall, encouraging model performance and the high level of detail offered by simulated data may help inform future smoke plume modeling work, plume-rise parameterizations and field experiment designs. View Full-Text
Keywords: wildfire plume rise; smoke modeling; large eddy simulation; emissions dispersion; WRF-SFIRE; RxCADRE wildfire plume rise; smoke modeling; large eddy simulation; emissions dispersion; WRF-SFIRE; RxCADRE
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Moisseeva, N.; Stull, R. Capturing Plume Rise and Dispersion with a Coupled Large-Eddy Simulation: Case Study of a Prescribed Burn. Atmosphere 2019, 10, 579.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop