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Article

Slow Adaptive Response of Budding Yeast Cells to Stable Conditions of Continuous Culture Can Occur without Genome Modifications

1
Department of Microbial Biochemistry, Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Pawińskiego 5a, 02-106 Warsaw, Poland
2
Department of Genetics, Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Pawińskiego 5a, 02-106 Warsaw, Poland
3
Department of Bioinformatics, Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Pawińskiego 5a, 02-106 Warsaw, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Genes 2020, 11(12), 1419; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes11121419
Received: 9 November 2020 / Revised: 24 November 2020 / Accepted: 25 November 2020 / Published: 27 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Genetic Aspects of Yeast: Cell Biology, Ecology and Biotechnology)
Continuous cultures assure the invariability of environmental conditions and the metabolic state of cultured microorganisms, whereas batch-cultured cells undergo constant changes in nutrients availability. For that reason, continuous culture is sometimes employed in the whole transcriptome, whole proteome, or whole metabolome studies. However, the typical method for establishing uniform growth of a cell population, i.e., by limited chemostat, results in the enrichment of the cell population gene pool with mutations adaptive for starvation conditions. These adaptive changes can skew the results of large-scale studies. It is commonly assumed that these adaptations reflect changes in the genome, and this assumption has been confirmed experimentally in rare cases. Here we show that in a population of budding yeast cells grown for over 200 generations in continuous culture in non-limiting minimal medium and therefore not subject to selection pressure, remodeling of transcriptome occurs, but not as a result of the accumulation of adaptive mutations. The observed changes indicate a shift in the metabolic balance towards catabolism, a decrease in ribosome biogenesis, a decrease in general stress alertness, reorganization of the cell wall, and transactions occurring at the cell periphery. These adaptive changes signify the acquisition of a new lifestyle in a stable nonstressful environment. The absence of underlying adaptive mutations suggests these changes may be regulated by another mechanism. View Full-Text
Keywords: transcriptome; stress alertness; Saccharomyces cerevisiae; epigenetic; adaptation; transcription factor transcriptome; stress alertness; Saccharomyces cerevisiae; epigenetic; adaptation; transcription factor
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MDPI and ACS Style

Klim, J.; Zielenkiewicz, U.; Kurlandzka, A.; Kaczanowski, S.; Skoneczny, M. Slow Adaptive Response of Budding Yeast Cells to Stable Conditions of Continuous Culture Can Occur without Genome Modifications. Genes 2020, 11, 1419. https://doi.org/10.3390/genes11121419

AMA Style

Klim J, Zielenkiewicz U, Kurlandzka A, Kaczanowski S, Skoneczny M. Slow Adaptive Response of Budding Yeast Cells to Stable Conditions of Continuous Culture Can Occur without Genome Modifications. Genes. 2020; 11(12):1419. https://doi.org/10.3390/genes11121419

Chicago/Turabian Style

Klim, Joanna, Urszula Zielenkiewicz, Anna Kurlandzka, Szymon Kaczanowski, and Marek Skoneczny. 2020. "Slow Adaptive Response of Budding Yeast Cells to Stable Conditions of Continuous Culture Can Occur without Genome Modifications" Genes 11, no. 12: 1419. https://doi.org/10.3390/genes11121419

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