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Roles of Autophagy-Related Genes in the Pathogenesis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

by Sup Kim 1,2,3,4, Hyuk Soo Eun 5,6 and Eun-Kyeong Jo 1,2,3,*
1
Department of Microbiology, Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Daejeon 35015, Korea
2
Department of Medical Science, Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Daejeon 35015, Korea
3
Infection Control Convergence Research Center, Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Daejeon 35015, Korea
4
Department of Radiation Oncology, Chungnam National University Hospital, 282, Munwha-ro, Jung-gu, Daejeon 34952, Korea
5
Department of Internal Medicine, Chungnam National University Hospital, 282, Munwha-ro, Jung-gu, Daejeon 34952, Korea
6
Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Chungnam National University, 266, Munwha-ro, Jung-gu, Daejeon 35015, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Cells 2019, 8(1), 77; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells8010077
Received: 15 December 2018 / Revised: 9 January 2019 / Accepted: 11 January 2019 / Published: 21 January 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Autophagy in Tissue Injury and Homeostasis)
Autophagy is an intracellular catabolic process that is essential for a variety of cellular responses. Due to its role in the maintenance of biological homeostasis in conditions of stress, dysregulation or disruption of autophagy may be linked to human diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). IBD is a complicated inflammatory colitis disorder; Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are the principal types. Genetic studies have shown the clinical relevance of several autophagy-related genes (ATGs) in the pathogenesis of IBD. Additionally, recent studies using conditional knockout mice have led to a comprehensive understanding of ATGs that affect intestinal inflammation, Paneth cell abnormality and enteric pathogenic infection during colitis. In this review, we discuss the various ATGs involved in macroautophagy and selective autophagy, including ATG16L1, IRGM, LRRK2, ATG7, p62, optineurin and TFEB in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis. Although advances have been made regarding the involvement of ATGs in maintaining intestinal homeostasis, determining the precise contribution of autophagy has remained elusive. Recent efforts based on direct targeting of ATGs and autophagy will further facilitate the development of new therapeutic opportunities for IBD. View Full-Text
Keywords: autophagy; ATGs; intestinal homeostasis; inflammatory bowel diseases autophagy; ATGs; intestinal homeostasis; inflammatory bowel diseases
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kim, S.; Eun, H.S.; Jo, E.-K. Roles of Autophagy-Related Genes in the Pathogenesis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Cells 2019, 8, 77.

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