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Agronomy 2019, 9(4), 188; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy9040188

Cereal Root Interactions with Soilborne Pathogens—From Trait to Gene and Back

1
USDA-ARS Wheat Health, Genetics and Quality, Pullman, WA 99164-6430, USA
2
USDA-ARS Horticultural Crops Research Unit, Corvallis, OR 97330-5098, USA
3
Department of Horticulture, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-6414, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 12 March 2019 / Revised: 3 April 2019 / Accepted: 10 April 2019 / Published: 13 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Root-Soil Interactions)
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Abstract

Realizing the yield potential of crop plants in the presence of shifting pathogen populations, soil quality, rainfall, and other agro-environmental variables remains a challenge for growers and breeders worldwide. In this review, we discuss current approaches for combatting the soilborne phytopathogenic nematodes, Pratylenchus and Heterodera of wheat and barley, and Meloidogyne graminicola Golden and Birchfield, 1965 of rice. The necrotrophic fungal pathogens, Rhizoctonia solani Kühn 1858 AG-8 and Fusarium spp. of wheat and barley, also are discussed. These pathogens constitute major causes of yield loss in small-grain cereals of the Pacific Northwest, USA and throughout the world. Current topics include new sources of genetic resistance, molecular leads from whole genome sequencing and genome-wide patterns of hosts, nematode or fungal gene expression during root-pathogen interactions, host-induced gene silencing, and building a molecular toolbox of genes and regulatory sequences for deployment of resistance genes. In conclusion, improvement of wheat, barley, and rice will require multiple approaches. View Full-Text
Keywords: genetic resistance; root disease; wheat; rice; barley; nematodes; transcriptomics; HIGS; DORN1; nematode-inducible promoters genetic resistance; root disease; wheat; rice; barley; nematodes; transcriptomics; HIGS; DORN1; nematode-inducible promoters
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

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Okubara, P.A.; Peetz, A.B.; Sharpe, R.M. Cereal Root Interactions with Soilborne Pathogens—From Trait to Gene and Back. Agronomy 2019, 9, 188.

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