Next Article in Journal
Effects of Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas fluorescens Inoculation on Attributes of the Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) Soil Rhizosphere Microbial Community: The Role of the Management System
Next Article in Special Issue
Portfolios of Climate Smart Agriculture Practices in Smallholder Rice-Wheat System of Eastern Indo-Gangetic Plains—Crop Productivity, Resource Use Efficiency and Environmental Foot Prints
Previous Article in Journal
Antifungal Activity of Chitosan Oligomers–Amino Acid Conjugate Complexes against Fusarium culmorum in Spelt (Triticum spelta L.)
Previous Article in Special Issue
Evapotranspiration and Precipitation over Pasture and Soybean Areas in the Xingu River Basin, an Expanding Amazonian Agricultural Frontier
Article

Impact of Water Stress on Microbial Community and Activity in Sandy and Loamy Soils

1
Department of Microbiology, Institute of Soil Science and Plant Cultivation—State Research Institute, Czartoryskich 8, 24-100 Pulawy, Poland
2
Department of Soil Science Erosion and Land Protection, Institute of Soil Science and Plant Cultivation—State Research Institute, Czartoryskich 8, 24-100 Pulawy, Poland
3
Faculty of Science and Health, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Konstantynów 1 H, 20-708 Lublin, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agronomy 2020, 10(9), 1429; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10091429
Received: 14 August 2020 / Revised: 13 September 2020 / Accepted: 17 September 2020 / Published: 19 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change, Agriculture, and Food Security)
Prolonged drought and extreme precipitation can have a significant impact on the activity and structure of soil microbial communities. The aim of the study was to assess the impact of drought length on the dynamics of mineral nitrogen, enzyme activities and bacterial diversity in two soils of different texture (sand and silt loam, according to USDA classification). An additional objective was to evaluate the effect of compost on the alleviation of soil microbial responses to stress conditions, i.e. alternating periods of drought and excessive soil moisture. The pot study was carried out in a greenhouse under controlled conditions. Compost was added at an amount equal to 3% of soil to the sandy soil, which was characterised by a significantly lower water retention capacity. Specific levels of water stress conditions were created through application of drought and soil watering periods. For each soil, four levels of moisture regimes were set-up, including optimal conditions kept at 60% of field water holding capacity, and three levels of water stress: The low level—2 week period without watering; the medium level—1 month drought period followed by watering to full but short-term soil saturation with water; and the high level—2 month drought period followed by full and long-term saturation with the same total amount of water, as in other variants. The soil water regime strongly modified the activities of dehydrogenases and acid and alkaline phosphatase, as well as the bacterial diversity. Loamy soil exhibited greater resistance to the inhibition of soil enzymatic activity. After irrigation, following both a 1 month and 2 month drought, the enzyme activities and nitrification largely recovered in soil with a loamy texture. Drought induced substantial shifts in the functional diversity of bacterial communities. The use of such C substrates, as carboxylic and acetic acids, was strongly inhibited by water deficit. Water deficit induced changes in the relative abundances of particular phyla, for example, an increase in Acidobacteria or a decrease in Verrucomicrobia. The study clearly proves the greater susceptibility of microbial communities to drought in sandy soils and the important role of exogenous organic matter in protecting microbial activity in drought periods. View Full-Text
Keywords: bacteria; biodiversity; drought; enzyme activity; nitrification bacteria; biodiversity; drought; enzyme activity; nitrification
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Siebielec, S.; Siebielec, G.; Klimkowicz-Pawlas, A.; Gałązka, A.; Grządziel, J.; Stuczyński, T. Impact of Water Stress on Microbial Community and Activity in Sandy and Loamy Soils. Agronomy 2020, 10, 1429. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10091429

AMA Style

Siebielec S, Siebielec G, Klimkowicz-Pawlas A, Gałązka A, Grządziel J, Stuczyński T. Impact of Water Stress on Microbial Community and Activity in Sandy and Loamy Soils. Agronomy. 2020; 10(9):1429. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10091429

Chicago/Turabian Style

Siebielec, Sylwia, Grzegorz Siebielec, Agnieszka Klimkowicz-Pawlas, Anna Gałązka, Jarosław Grządziel, and Tomasz Stuczyński. 2020. "Impact of Water Stress on Microbial Community and Activity in Sandy and Loamy Soils" Agronomy 10, no. 9: 1429. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10091429

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop