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Open AccessArticle

Trifluralin and Atrazine Sensitivity to Selected Cereal and Legume Crops

1
Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation (Charles Sturt University and NSW Department of Primary Industries), School of Agricultural and Wine Sciences, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, NSW 2678, Australia
2
Department of Agronomy, Sher-e-Bangla Agricultural University, Sher-e-Bangla Nagar, Dhaka 1207, Bangladesh
3
Australian Rivers Institute and School of Environment and Science, Griffith University, Nathan, QLD 4111, Australia
4
Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation (Charles Sturt University and NSW Department of Primary Industries), NSW Department of Primary Industries, Wagga Wagga, NSW 2650, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agronomy 2020, 10(4), 587; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10040587
Received: 17 March 2020 / Revised: 8 April 2020 / Accepted: 15 April 2020 / Published: 20 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Weed Management and Pesticide Application Technology)
Soil-applied herbicides can persist in sufficient concentrations to affect the growth of crops in rotations. The sensitivity of wheat, barley, oat, lucerne and lentil to trifluralin and atrazine residues were investigated with three glasshouse experiments in 2018 and 2019. Each bioassay crop species was tested against different concentrations of trifluralin and atrazine in sandy soil using a full factorial design. Shoot and root parameters of the tested crop species were fitted in logistic equations against herbicide concentrations to calculate effective doses for 50% growth inhibition (ED50). Results revealed that both shoot and root parameters of all the test crop species were significantly affected by trifluralin and atrazine. Trifluralin delayed crop emergence at the lower concentrations examined, while higher concentrations prevented emergence entirely. Low concentrations of atrazine did not affect emergence but significantly reduced plant height, soil–plant analyses development (SPAD) index, shoot dry weight, root length, root dry weight and number of nodules of all the crop species. At high concentration, atrazine resulted in plant death. Legumes were found to be more sensitive than cereals when exposed to both trifluralin and atrazine treatments, with lucerne being the most sensitive to both herbicides, ED50 ranging from 0.01 to 0.07 mg/kg soil for trifluralin; and from 0.004 to 0.01 mg/kg for atrazine. Barley was the most tolerant species observed in terms of the two herbicides tested. Lucerne can be used to develop a simple but reliable bioassay technique to estimate herbicide residues in the soil so that a sound crop rotation strategy can be implemented. View Full-Text
Keywords: trifluralin; atrazine; herbicide sensitivity; bioassay; cereals; legumes trifluralin; atrazine; herbicide sensitivity; bioassay; cereals; legumes
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MDPI and ACS Style

Chowdhury, I.F.; Doran, G.S.; Stodart, B.J.; Chen, C.; Wu, H. Trifluralin and Atrazine Sensitivity to Selected Cereal and Legume Crops. Agronomy 2020, 10, 587.

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