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Article

A Whole-Slurry Fermentation Approach to High-Solid Loading for Bioethanol Production from Corn Stover

1
Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Science, Universidade de Vigo (Campus Ourense), As Lagoas, 32004 Ourense, Spain
2
Environmental Technology and Assessment Laboratory, Campus da Auga-Campus Ourense, Universidade de Vigo, 32004 Ourense, Spain
3
Nutrition and Bromatology Group, Department of Analytical and Food Chemistry, Faculty of Food Science and Technology, Universidade de Vigo (Campus Ourense), 32004 Ourense, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Agronomy 2020, 10(11), 1790; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10111790
Received: 30 October 2020 / Revised: 10 November 2020 / Accepted: 13 November 2020 / Published: 15 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Maize Breeding for Alternative and Multiple Uses)
Corn stover is the most produced byproduct from maize worldwide. Since it is generated as a residue from maize harvesting, it is an inexpensive and interesting crop residue to be used as a feedstock. An ecologically friendly pretreatment such as autohydrolysis was selected for the manufacture of second-generation bioethanol from corn stover via whole-slurry fermentation at high-solid loadings. Temperatures from 200 to 240 °C were set for the autohydrolysis process, and the solid and liquid phases were analyzed. Additionally, the enzymatic susceptibility of the solid phases was assessed to test the suitability of the pretreatment. Afterward, the production of bioethanol from autohydrolyzed corn stover was carried out, mixing the solid with different percentages of the autohydrolysis liquor (25%, 50%, 75%, and 100%) and water (0% of liquor), from a total whole slurry fermentation (saving energy and water in the liquid–solid separation and subsequent washing of the solid phase) to employing water as only liquid medium. In spite of the challenging scenario of using the liquor fraction as liquid phase in the fermentation, values between 32.2 and 41.9 g ethanol/L and ethanol conversions up to 80% were achieved. This work exhibits the feasibility of corn stover for the production of bioethanol via a whole-slurry fermentation process. View Full-Text
Keywords: agro-industrial residue; autohydrolysis; environmentally friendly pretreatment; biofuels; simultaneous saccharification and fermentation agro-industrial residue; autohydrolysis; environmentally friendly pretreatment; biofuels; simultaneous saccharification and fermentation
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MDPI and ACS Style

G. del Río, P.; Gullón, P.; Rebelo, F.R.; Romaní, A.; Garrote, G.; Gullón, B. A Whole-Slurry Fermentation Approach to High-Solid Loading for Bioethanol Production from Corn Stover. Agronomy 2020, 10, 1790. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10111790

AMA Style

G. del Río P, Gullón P, Rebelo FR, Romaní A, Garrote G, Gullón B. A Whole-Slurry Fermentation Approach to High-Solid Loading for Bioethanol Production from Corn Stover. Agronomy. 2020; 10(11):1790. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10111790

Chicago/Turabian Style

G. del Río, Pablo; Gullón, Patricia; Rebelo, F.R.; Romaní, Aloia; Garrote, Gil; Gullón, Beatriz. 2020. "A Whole-Slurry Fermentation Approach to High-Solid Loading for Bioethanol Production from Corn Stover" Agronomy 10, no. 11: 1790. https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10111790

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