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Open AccessReview

Current Advances in 3D Bioprinting Technology and Its Applications for Tissue Engineering

1
Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Integrative Engineering, Chung-Ang University, 221 Heukseok-Dong, Dongjak-Gu, Seoul 06974, Korea
2
Department of Nature-Inspired System and Application, Korea Institute of Machinery & Materials, 156 Gajeongbuk-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 34103, Korea
3
Department of 3D Printing, Korea Institute of Machinery & Materials, 156 Gajeongbuk-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 34103, Korea
4
Department of Engineering Mechanics, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Jilin University, No. 5988, Renmin Street, Changchun 130025, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Polymers 2020, 12(12), 2958; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12122958
Received: 12 October 2020 / Revised: 30 November 2020 / Accepted: 7 December 2020 / Published: 11 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymers in Biomedical Engineering)
Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting technology has emerged as a powerful biofabrication platform for tissue engineering because of its ability to engineer living cells and biomaterial-based 3D objects. Over the last few decades, droplet-based, extrusion-based, and laser-assisted bioprinters have been developed to fulfill certain requirements in terms of resolution, cell viability, cell density, etc. Simultaneously, various bio-inks based on natural–synthetic biomaterials have been developed and applied for successful tissue regeneration. To engineer more realistic artificial tissues/organs, mixtures of bio-inks with various recipes have also been developed. Taken together, this review describes the fundamental characteristics of the existing bioprinters and bio-inks that have been currently developed, followed by their advantages and disadvantages. Finally, various tissue engineering applications using 3D bioprinting are briefly introduced. View Full-Text
Keywords: 3D bioprinter; natural polymer; synthetic polymer; bio-ink; tissue engineering 3D bioprinter; natural polymer; synthetic polymer; bio-ink; tissue engineering
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MDPI and ACS Style

Yu, J.; Park, S.A; Kim, W.D.; Ha, T.; Xin, Y.-Z.; Lee, J.; Lee, D. Current Advances in 3D Bioprinting Technology and Its Applications for Tissue Engineering. Polymers 2020, 12, 2958. https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12122958

AMA Style

Yu J, Park SA, Kim WD, Ha T, Xin Y-Z, Lee J, Lee D. Current Advances in 3D Bioprinting Technology and Its Applications for Tissue Engineering. Polymers. 2020; 12(12):2958. https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12122958

Chicago/Turabian Style

Yu, JunJie; Park, Su A; Kim, Wan D.; Ha, Taeho; Xin, Yuan-Zhu; Lee, JunHee; Lee, Donghyun. 2020. "Current Advances in 3D Bioprinting Technology and Its Applications for Tissue Engineering" Polymers 12, no. 12: 2958. https://doi.org/10.3390/polym12122958

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