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Catalysts 2019, 9(2), 199; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal9020199

The Support Effects on the Direct Conversion of Syngas to Higher Alcohol Synthesis over Copper-Based Catalysts

1
State Key Laboratory of Coal Conversion, Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan 030001, China
2
School of Chemical Science, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
3
Technology Center, Shanxi Lu’an Mining (Group) Co. Ltd., Changzhi 046204, China
4
National Engineering Research Center for Coal-Based Synthesis, Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan 030001, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 21 January 2019 / Revised: 7 February 2019 / Accepted: 9 February 2019 / Published: 21 February 2019
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Abstract

The types of supports employed profoundly influence the physicochemical properties and performances of as-prepared catalysts in almost all catalytic systems. Herein, Cu catalysts, with different supports (SiO2, Al2O3), were prepared by a facile impregnation method and used for the direct synthesis of higher alcohols from CO hydrogenation. The prepared catalysts were characterized using multiple techniques, such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 sorption, H2-temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR), temperature-programmed desorption of ammonia (NH3-TPD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and in situ Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), etc. Compared to the Cu/Al2O3 catalyst, the Cu/SiO2 catalyst easily promoted the formation of a higher amount of C1 oxygenate species on the surface, which is closely related to the formation of higher alcohols. Simultaneously, the Cu/Al2O3 and Cu/SiO2 catalysts showed obvious differences in the CO conversion, alcohol distribution, and CO2 selectivity, which were probably originated from differences in the structural and physicochemical properties, such as the types of copper species, the reduction behaviors, acidity, and electronic properties. Besides, it was also found that the gap in performances in two kinds of catalysts with the different supports could be narrowed by the addition of potassium because of its neutralization to surface acidy of Al2O3 and the creation of new basic sites, as well as the alteration of electronic properties. View Full-Text
Keywords: CO hydrogenation; higher alcohols; support effects; Cu-based catalysts CO hydrogenation; higher alcohols; support effects; Cu-based catalysts
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Li, X.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, W.; Zhang, M.; Xie, H.; Wu, Y.; Tan, Y. The Support Effects on the Direct Conversion of Syngas to Higher Alcohol Synthesis over Copper-Based Catalysts. Catalysts 2019, 9, 199.

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