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Review

Review of Myeloma Therapies and Their Potential for Oral and Maxillofacial Side Effects

by 1,2,*, 3,4,5 and 5
1
Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, VIC 3000, Australia
2
Melbourne Dental School, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC 3000, Australia
3
Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC 3000, Australia
4
Centre of Excellence for Cellular Immunotherapy, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, VIC 3000, Australia
5
Clinical Haematology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, VIC 3000, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Sikander Ailawadhi
Cancers 2021, 13(17), 4479; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers13174479
Received: 8 August 2021 / Revised: 29 August 2021 / Accepted: 2 September 2021 / Published: 6 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multiple Myeloma: Targeted Therapy and Immunotherapy)
Myeloma is a common cancer involving the bone marrow. Some of the medications used in the treatment of myeloma, including those that reduce the risk of bone fractures, can increase the chance of side effects occurring in the jawbone. The most serious complication in the jawbone is called medication-related osteonecrosis, meaning part of the jawbone dies. The aim of this review is to highlight some of the medications that are implicated and other risk factors that can contribute to osteonecrosis. Suggestions to prevent this complication from occurring are described. Conventional methods of treating established medication-related osteonecrosis of the jawbone are outlined as well as emerging new treatments.
Myeloma is a common haematological malignancy in which adverse skeletal related events are frequently seen. Over recent years, treatment for myeloma has evolved leading to improved survival. Antiresorptive therapy is an important adjunct therapy to reduce the risk of bone fractures and to improve the quality of life for myeloma patients; however, this has the potential for unwanted side effects in the oral cavity and maxillofacial region. Osteonecrosis of the jaw related to antiresorptive medications and other myeloma therapies is not uncommon. This review serves to highlight the risk of osteonecrosis of the jaw for myeloma patients, with some suggestions for prevention and management. View Full-Text
Keywords: myeloma therapy; oral and maxillofacial side effects; medication related osteonecrosis of the jaw myeloma therapy; oral and maxillofacial side effects; medication related osteonecrosis of the jaw
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MDPI and ACS Style

Beaumont, S.; Harrison, S.; Er, J. Review of Myeloma Therapies and Their Potential for Oral and Maxillofacial Side Effects. Cancers 2021, 13, 4479. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers13174479

AMA Style

Beaumont S, Harrison S, Er J. Review of Myeloma Therapies and Their Potential for Oral and Maxillofacial Side Effects. Cancers. 2021; 13(17):4479. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers13174479

Chicago/Turabian Style

Beaumont, Sophie, Simon Harrison, and Jeremy Er. 2021. "Review of Myeloma Therapies and Their Potential for Oral and Maxillofacial Side Effects" Cancers 13, no. 17: 4479. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers13174479

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