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Targeting ALK in Cancer: Therapeutic Potential of Proapoptotic Peptides

1
Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON M5G 1X5, Canada
2
Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 1A1, Canada
3
INSERM, UDEAR, UMR1056, F-31300 Toulouse, France
4
University of Toulouse, F-31300 Toulouse, France
5
Department of Ophthalmology, Toulouse University Hospital, F-31300 Toulouse, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Cancers 2019, 11(3), 275; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers11030275
Received: 20 December 2018 / Revised: 13 February 2019 / Accepted: 21 February 2019 / Published: 26 February 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Targeting ALK in Cancer)
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Abstract

ALK is a receptor tyrosine kinase, associated with many tumor types as diverse as anaplastic large cell lymphomas, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors, breast and renal cell carcinomas, non-small cell lung cancer, neuroblastomas, and more. This makes ALK an attractive target for cancer therapy. Since ALK–driven tumors are dependent for their proliferation on the constitutively activated ALK kinase, a number of tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been developed to block tumor growth. While some inhibitors are under investigation in clinical trials, others are now approved for treatment, notably in ALK-positive lung cancer. Their efficacy is remarkable, however limited in time, as the tumors escape and become resistant to the treatment through different mechanisms. Hence, there is a pressing need to target ALK-dependent tumors by other therapeutic strategies, and possibly use them in combination with kinase inhibitors. In this review we will focus on the therapeutic potential of proapoptotic ALK-derived peptides based on the dependence receptor properties of ALK. We will also try to make a non-exhaustive list of several alternative treatments targeting ALK-dependent and independent signaling pathways. View Full-Text
Keywords: anaplastic lymphoma kinase; ALK; tyrosine kinase; dependence receptor; proapoptotic peptides; tyrosine kinase inhibitor; anaplastic large cell lymphoma; non-small-cell lung cancer; neuroblastoma; targeted therapy anaplastic lymphoma kinase; ALK; tyrosine kinase; dependence receptor; proapoptotic peptides; tyrosine kinase inhibitor; anaplastic large cell lymphoma; non-small-cell lung cancer; neuroblastoma; targeted therapy
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Aubry, A.; Galiacy, S.; Allouche, M. Targeting ALK in Cancer: Therapeutic Potential of Proapoptotic Peptides. Cancers 2019, 11, 275.

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