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Open AccessEditorial

Kinases and Cancer

1
Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Genetics, Max F. Perutz Laboratories, University of Vienna, 1030 Vienna, Austria
2
Proteomics Center, Institute of Biochemistry, Vilnius University Life Sciences Center, Sauletekio al. 7, LT-10257 Vilnius, Lithuania
3
MAP Kinase Resource, Bioinformatics, Melchiorstrasse 9, 3027 Bern, Switzerland
4
CALIPHO Group, SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, 1 rue Michel-Servet, CH-1211 Geneva 4, Switzerland
5
Faculty of Medicine; University of Geneva; 1 rue Michel-Servet, CH-1211 Geneva 4, Switzerland
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Cancers 2018, 10(3), 63; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers10030063
Received: 27 February 2018 / Revised: 28 February 2018 / Accepted: 28 February 2018 / Published: 1 March 2018
(This article belongs to the Collection Kinases and Cancer)
Protein kinases are a large family of enzymes catalyzing protein phosphorylation. The human genome contains 518 protein kinase genes, 478 of which belong to the classical protein kinase family and 40 are atypical protein kinases [...]
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Cicenas, J.; Zalyte, E.; Bairoch, A.; Gaudet, P. Kinases and Cancer. Cancers 2018, 10, 63.

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