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Review

mTOR Cross-Talk in Cancer and Potential for Combination Therapy

1
Medical Oncology 1, IRCCS Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome 00144, Italy
2
Department of Medical-surgical Sciences and Translational Medicine, University of Rome, La Sapienza, Rome 00185, Italy
3
Department of Molecular Medicine, University of Rome, La Sapienza, Rome 00185, Italy
4
Medical OncologyUnit, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Integrata, University of Verona, Verona 37100, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Cancers 2018, 10(1), 23; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers10010023
Received: 19 December 2017 / Revised: 15 January 2018 / Accepted: 16 January 2018 / Published: 19 January 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue mTOR Pathway in Cancer)
The mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) pathway plays an essential role in sensing and integrating a variety of exogenous cues to regulate cellular growth and metabolism, in both physiological and pathological conditions. mTOR functions through two functionally and structurally distinct multi-component complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, which interact with each other and with several elements of other signaling pathways. In the past few years, many new insights into mTOR function and regulation have been gained and extensive genetic and pharmacological studies in mice have enhanced our understanding of how mTOR dysfunction contributes to several diseases, including cancer. Single-agent mTOR targeting, mostly using rapalogs, has so far met limited clinical success; however, due to the extensive cross-talk between mTOR and other pathways, combined approaches are the most promising avenues to improve clinical efficacy of available therapeutics and overcome drug resistance. This review provides a brief and up-to-date narrative on the regulation of mTOR function, the relative contributions of mTORC1 and mTORC2 complexes to cancer development and progression, and prospects for mTOR inhibition as a therapeutic strategy. View Full-Text
Keywords: mTORC1; mTORC2; cancer; cross-talk; targeted therapies mTORC1; mTORC2; cancer; cross-talk; targeted therapies
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MDPI and ACS Style

Conciatori, F.; Ciuffreda, L.; Bazzichetto, C.; Falcone, I.; Pilotto, S.; Bria, E.; Cognetti, F.; Milella, M. mTOR Cross-Talk in Cancer and Potential for Combination Therapy. Cancers 2018, 10, 23. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers10010023

AMA Style

Conciatori F, Ciuffreda L, Bazzichetto C, Falcone I, Pilotto S, Bria E, Cognetti F, Milella M. mTOR Cross-Talk in Cancer and Potential for Combination Therapy. Cancers. 2018; 10(1):23. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers10010023

Chicago/Turabian Style

Conciatori, Fabiana, Ludovica Ciuffreda, Chiara Bazzichetto, Italia Falcone, Sara Pilotto, Emilio Bria, Francesco Cognetti, and Michele Milella. 2018. "mTOR Cross-Talk in Cancer and Potential for Combination Therapy" Cancers 10, no. 1: 23. https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers10010023

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